Could this be true? Article in Landscapeonline.com

State of Ohio nixes LEED???  Why would they do such a thing?

Views: 463

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/ohio-senate-passes-bil...

They are "deeply concerned that the LEED rating system is becoming a tool to punish chemical companies and plastics makers." They prefer Green Globes, which is more lumber, plastic and generally industry friendly.

LEED has a terrible reputation of preferring certain companies and technologies while outright excluding others.  I took the LEED-AP exam for new construction back in June 2009, although I failed the exam by one point.  When I prepared for the exam I was outright appalled at the restrictions of vendors and technologies on several credits, including energy commissioning, wood byproducts, etc. Rather than adhere to a rigid system, get back to the basics and focus on simple BMPs.  Finally, just because a building is certified at construction, operations and maintenance is heavily overlooked and can create serious cost overruns over time.  

Thanks for posting, Mr. Ray. Very interesting.

Frankly, for reasons we've discussed before, even if sponsored by other interests, I hope it's the start of a trend.

There is also the issue that a great many LEED buildings do not perform any better, and in some cases, WORSE than their non-LEED counterparts. Worse even than older buildings. The design of many LEED buildings is far from the most energy efficient possibility. Architects know the "loopholes" to have a building still be LEED, but be an energy hog thanks to floor to ceiling windows, smaller HVAC systems that have to work harder, and poor energy modeling and simulations. They can't even get the solar studies correct most of the time.

Many places are looking to get off of the LEED standard and are instead looking towards revamping building codes to achieve the same goals.

LEED is also private and proprietary, so no other accepted "competition" exists for the rating systems, so many governments are looking at not mandating LEED compliance for public buildings due to this fact. LEED also costs a bunch of money to implement.

The first time that I had a project by a landscape architect with half the alphabet of LEED letters after his name come across my desk in a CE's office, he was proposing several outdoor gas torches and gas fire pits for a summer seasonal resort on Cape Cod where the nights are about 5 degrees cooler than the days in the summer. How is that conserving energy or saving the environment? I thought that was pretty phony.

Oddly enough, I was the landscape architect (with know LEED credentials) on a residential project that got LEED Gold certification. Obviously, most of that had to do with the building, but the landscape had to meet those standards as well. 

... the part that is odd to me is that it required a lot of scrutiny and was difficult to permit because it is in the buffer to a wetland. You would think that building there would disqualify you right off the bat. Instead, it is celebrated as being environmentally sensitive. All I did was apply my knowledge of what it takes to mitigate in a buffer to a wetland which more than met the requirements for the house to get certification.

I've said it a bunch of times - being environmentally sensitive is not a niche nor unique to activists. I work on the "dark side" - for clients who want what they want. The fact is that regulation on the local and state level is quite strong in regulated areas. If you work in places that are regulated you'll either learn and adapt or you won't be working their whether you wear socks and sandal or hunting boots on week ends.

Cost of energy is a stronger motivation than a certificate on the wall. Conservation is ever increasing with or without LEED.

I worked on a huge project that never got built. We had a session with a LEED leader, I felt something in my pocket. it was his hand looking for money.

LEED=good design without the high cost as Jason says.

RSS

New Jobs!

Members

Forum

Site Measuring Revisited Again

I've put up a couple of discussions in the past regarding tools and methods for site measuring to supplement a survey or for a small project. Back in November I saw the video below and decided to buy the Disto S910 because of its ability to export a…Continue

Started by Andrew Garulay, RLA in STORY BOARD yesterday.

Usage of Native Plant Material in Landscape Architecture 49 Replies

Can anyone out there recommend sites that would have somewhat scholarly papers on the use of native plants. I am looking for advocates of this practice and those who feel it is nonsense. I'm not looking for books, looking for papers. This for a side…Continue

Started by henry cohen in PLANTS & HORTICULTURE. Last reply by KEVIN on Friday.

Editorial: Eligibility requirements for State Landscape Architect Licenses 31 Replies

June 28, 2015Dear Land8 Members:ANY LAND8 member should feel free to add their own comments here.EDITORIAL:  It's my opinion......that EVERY student who earns a Landscape Architecture Degree. (4 yr., 5 yr. or Masters in Landscape Architectures)…Continue

Started by J. Robert Wainner in STORY BOARD. Last reply by J. Robert Wainner on Thursday.

Project Manager Training? 4 Replies

I was wondering if anybody out there had a formal or informal PM "break in" or training program. The PM programs that I've looked into don't really apply to landscape architecture. There's got to be something for architecture or another allied field…Continue

Started by Colter Sonneville in PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Last reply by J. Robert Wainner on Thursday.

© 2017   Created by Andrew Spiering.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service