Does anyone know of books that list plant communities?

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For my neck of the woods there's one called Biotic Communities for Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico which I used in school a lot. This probably won't work for New York though :-). You might try using the words 'Biotic' or 'Biota' in your online search. Also try the geographic region name such as Adirondack Upland, Appalachian Upland, etc.

Mark

Thanks for the reply. Yes you are correct sir, will do me no good in NY. I did do a search on Amazon and came up with a few. There was one that I saw a few years ago, but didn't write down the title.

Hoping someone will mention it and ring a bell.

Hi Henry!
I don't know if this will help much, but you might try checking Larry Weaner's website. He has some articles posted there - http://lweanerassociates.com/?page_id=14 

He presented at ASLA last year and I thought he would probably be a good authority on plant communities in your part of the world. If he doesn't have the information, I'd bet he lists resources...

Hope all is well with you!

Tanya

Tanya
Thanks for the heads up, I went to the site you spoke about and there was nothing for what I am looking for.
I saw a book on Amazon awhile ago but didn't wish list it. So back to amazon and a copious amount of looking.
Thanks again.
H

Hey, Henry, I am surprised that I can't think of anything! I geuss a local ecology book, for wherever geological area you are interested in,or the soil surveys books (still precious resources, although they want you to look on-line now..) "Reading the Landscap"e was one of my favorites, but not exactly what you are looking for perhaps, and there was some really nice ones for seaside gardening for the hamptons, I remember..

but for general overall, I am drawing a blank! and you know, that isTHE difference  between McHargs idea and the rest of the world that learns horticultural plantings and colors and layering... McHarg never bothered with that, it was all natural native plant groupings..

So good luck in your quest! I would be interested in what you find!

Trace!

Great to hear from you Interesting that you mention McHarg. I was looking through my old notebooks, info I gathered from the interwebb. It is from the Pa Dept.of Conservation and Natural Resources. I think I found it after taking a course at Temple, which was taught by a gut from Penn, who I'm sure was taught by McHarg. Well, yutz that I am I forgot about the info I have and put out the call. That's what happens when one gets old.

By the way the name of the paper is--Terrestrial & Palustrine Plant Communities of Pennsylvania. I doubt if you'll be interested in it, since you're scrambling to learn about xeriscape plants.

Hope all is well with you.

Best

H

Yes, I love Pennsylvania native plants, and just today,looking at some Ca. website, I realized that it is probably the native plant societies that should be your main resource - I remember out in Southampton the native plant groupings are what was used to define wetlands setbacks, very important for all homeowners..

But native Plant societies, that is what you want! 

nice to see your post, and I hope you are well also..

The Bronx is the best place on earth to live, besides brooklyn!

: ) 

Brooklyn ain't bad, but I be lovin the Bronx!

dept of conservation/environment/natural resources types have them, but their less accessible; I liked the 'Field Guide to the Piedmont' for central VA plant communities (went through successional communities as well).

There may be more of these that might be fun: https://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/3564/1/MohlerMa...

Plant community(sometimes "phytocoenosis" or "phytocenosis") is a collection or association[1]of plant species within a designated geographical unit, which forms a relatively uniform patch, distinguishable from neighboring patches of different vegetation types. The components of each plant community are influenced by soil type, topography, climate and human disturbance. In many cases there are several soil types within a given phytocoenosis
source include www.wikipedia.com, www.weedeaterguides.com
You need to visit the library on topics like this I presume, online is not really very reliable in this case.

I really don't understand your point. You're talking plant communities and this is a discussion about the use of natives or not. The links are nonsense. Why would I want to see about weed wackers?

Or are you being a wise ass?

didn't copy the complete links that's all.

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