Xerophytic Landscapes

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Xerophytic Landscapes

Location: San Diego, CA
Members: 88
Latest Activity: Apr 7, 2016

Landscape Architecture Discussion Forum

Pacific NW xeric/native plants 4 Replies

Started by Karen Oleson. Last reply by Morgan Vondrak Dec 6, 2008.

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Comment by Boilerplater on February 19, 2010 at 2:18pm
You guys may want to keep an eye on this nursery's offerings:
http://www.shadyoaks.com/
They are hybridizers and growers of liner stock. I met a couple of their breeders at a nursery show last September and they told me they are working on a variegated Octopus Agave, though its a few generations away. I think that'll be a big seller. I've become something of an Agave nut since I've relocated to the desert.
Comment by Jason Bennink on November 25, 2009 at 3:37pm
Just a thought from Soil Science perspective on reducing the water requirements for any plant. Use lots of organic material and or peat moss around the plant,(not too much) and surround other areas with sand. Make sure the drip is going on the water holding material. Sand has the lowest affinity for water while clay has the highest and organic material falls somewhere in between. Even using this type of material under a lawn with sand underneath of it(if you don't water enough for percolation to the sand) would save water because the water is being held in the soil around the plant and not being pulled on by a soil type with a higher water affinity.

Some plants(cactus) may not like being put in this type of material, and during periods of prolonged moisture, could be susceptible to pathogens. This concept contrasts with the common planting techniques of thoroughly mixing soil around plants but to save water it could be worth it. By the way this will not likely work in a predominately clay soil but may be useful in sandy or gravely soils.
Comment by umit harite on October 21, 2009 at 1:11am
Hello, Hope to exchange knowledge and experience. Regards to All. ümit harite from turkey
Comment by Bill Kisich on August 17, 2009 at 1:01pm
Charles, This is probably easier to deal with in Phoenix as most people don't really expect anything to live here without water. Even natives. I don't know how you can expect a plant that is used to regular and frequent irrigation at the grower, to suddenly become a plant that thrives with irregular and infrequent feeding.
Comment by Charles A. Warsinske on August 17, 2009 at 10:54am
Ya Bill, all I know is when a local suburban city requires the planting of natives in parking lot islands that get hammered by not only the heated asphalt but also the vehicle exhaust, I tend to shake my head. With pedestrians tromping through and no irrigation, it is just tough sledding. What we need is to educate the planners who write the development ordinances about the care and feeding of things that are alive.

Charlie
Comment by João Bicho e Joana Carneiro, LDA on August 15, 2009 at 3:41am
I Navid, the pine like plant looks like a grevilia flower. I'm not sure but it's similar.
Comment by Bill Kisich on August 14, 2009 at 8:16pm
Ya Charles, all the natives around here grow in balls and cubes. You never have to water them and they never grow past the 3' dia. ball or cube. They even flower in colors that contrast well with the building they are planted next to. I love natives. They're truely the answer to all your sustainable dreams. You just need more experience, buddy.
Comment by Charles A. Warsinske on August 14, 2009 at 1:00pm
We are being asked more and more to do less and less irrigation on our projects here in and around Seattle. One might think, "so what, it is always raining in Seattle." This is not quite true. We have had a very dry summer here but we are only about an inch below average for the year. Many native and non native plants are suffering, and will not survive. I have heard over and over again that if you just plant natives, you don't have to water or maintain and everything will be wonderful. Not the case. Soil preparation, hydrology/drainage, solar access/orientation and root establishment of the plants being installed is critical in using any plants, especially natives being used in a non-native environment.
Comment by Ernst Glaeser on July 16, 2009 at 1:13am
Hi folks, it's me on my lounge in Cairo, but active now in Abu Dhabi.
This is the place to try all this xerophytic plants and other material.
Whenever I come into a new arid area I try to studdy the the vegetation off the beaten tracks. Potential natural vegetation is the best indicator to meet climat and geology. We only (I guess that is the hardest part) have to interprete to meet the clients dreams.
Comment by Bethany Fee on July 14, 2009 at 4:32pm
Hello- I'm new to the group! Currently our LA firm has been dealing with the recent water restrictions- How do we (as Landscape Architects) get the word out that turf is no longer the San Diego landscape? We are in our 3rd consecutive year of drought and something has to change.
 

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Landscape Architecture Discussion Forum

Pacific NW xeric/native plants 4 Replies

Hello all. I am trying to refine my thesis question or topic. It is going to center around what design principles could successfully be used with native plants (primarily low water consuming varieties) particular to a specific bioregion (in my case…Continue

Started by Karen Oleson. Last reply by Morgan Vondrak Dec 6, 2008.

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