With a vision of a world enhanced by easier gardening, healthier produce, and food security for all, the Garden Tower Project is on a mission to "allow individuals and communities to easily become more self-sufficient, sustainable and ultimately create a more resilient local economy." 

The Garden Tower unit has over 45 plant openings and yields hundreds of veggies in just 4 square feet. Using a special recycled composting method, the veggies that grow in the Garden Tower use considerably less water then conventional growing methods. The middle part of this preassembled structure creates its own 'worm-activated' compost simply by adding your own kitchen scraps and worms. The added benefits of the worms - a perfectly aired soil, and the creation of vermicompost and microbes - allows this to become the perfect growing medium for plants. 

The Garden Tower team envisions this growing structure to be an answer to the food desert. "Distributed agriculture is key to local economic community resilience. Our only goal is to help people achieve a cheap easy and convenient way to grow their own clean, healthy and organic food," says co-founder Tom Tlusty.

Watch the video below to learn more about the creative design of the Garden Tower.

 

 

The height of the Garden Tower creates ease of use to people with physical limitations, allowing anyone to sit or stand while harvesting and planting. This means it is great for public environments, community gardens, and as an education tool. The size and aesthetic of the Garden Tower make it easy to fit into any urban setting - inside or outside - whether on a single balcony in the city, a few in an office building, or even a whole group of them in a neighbourhood farm. 

 

Tlusty's message to help further the urban and suburban agricultural movement is through, “support of local organic producers, farmers markets, community gardens, orchards, seed libraries and banks." He also is a strong advocate for, "planting only Organic Heirloom & Non-GMO fruits and vegetables," and believes, "education is paramount to the coming wave.”

 

 

With products like this one, it is easy for landscape architects to design a food producing space and specify this amazing product. Now, it is also easier for everyday people to think differently about where their food comes from, and how they can solve the current food problem. This designer and writer is sure looking forward to getting one!

 

Go to their website to learn more, and support the local food movement.

www.gardentowerproject.com

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