Marc Kovach

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  • #174352
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Thanks for the info.  I am going to look into them.

     

    #170239
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Steve – Several years ago I ran into a similar situation on a project in DC. The architect wanted to utilize as much of the existing cast iron main and copper laterals as possible. I am not sure what the life span is, but I would recommend taking a flow and pressure test at the end of the main. You may see a 6″ CI mainline, but after 50 years of collecting sediment and corrosion, the inside diameter might be equal to a 4″ line.

    #172092
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    I use Eagle Point with AutoCAD. When I reviewed it and other programs 3 years ago it was not compatible with LT. I think the sprinkler data base is helpful and speeds along the design process, but you could probably get by with LT if you take the time to create an extensive enough list of blocks.

    All the irrigation design software I am aware of will allow you a trial version. Three years ago AutoCAD also had a 30-day trial version. If I were you, I would get the trial versions and see what you think.

    #173134
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    To try to answer the irrigation side of the question, most likely you would need at the very minimum a temporary irrigation system to get things established. The need for irrigation after establishment really depends on the plant selection and overall roof design.

    #173582
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Kerri – The only reason I could see that the disruption of the existing system would be “necessary” would be if the site is going to be undergoing renovations to existing grade. In this case it may cost more to avoid damage to the sprinklers than it would be to just rip them out. However, without more background knowledge, I am just trying to guess on the reasoning.

    #174222
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Many point to suburbia and the problem with dependence on the car. I assume many are mentioning this because of America’s increase in commuting times, etc. How many of us could do the majority of our work from home with a decent computer, high-speed internet and a phone. Before starting my own business I spent two hours a day commuting back and forth to work. I could have easily worked from home 4 of the 5 days of the work week. The owners of the firm did not like the idea of anyone working from home.

    If 10% of America’s work force began to work from home, would automobiles, transportation, overcrowded roads really be as much of a problem?

    #173924
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Brian,

    I had similar feelings after reading this article over the weekend, which is the first reason I posted the article. The second reason I posted it was to find out how others felt about it. Having your opinions challenged is a great way to keep yourself in check!

    #174232
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    I would have to say that everyone brings up really good points, and that our current situation can not be blamed on only one thing. When I resided in the DC metro area several years ago the suburbs and xurbs grew exponentially. The reason for growth was not only caused by people’s desire to leave the city and its preception of problems, but because cost of renting or purchasing a place near work became so high that they were left with no other alternative. During an interview I had with the one firm, I was told bluntly that they do not pay enough to live near their location in Dulles, VA, and that most employees lived in Frederick, MD. Commute was about an hour. This was not for a bad paying job, but it was the reality of the real estate market at the time. When the gas prices started to climb last year, all the sudden, no one could afford the housing prices any longer and the prices plummeting.

    I guess what I trying to convey in my ramblings is that I feel that there are so many factors that occurred that got us to where we are today: Housing market, fickle commodity and future markets, people living out of their means, etc. What ever you want to blame, I just hope the solution is not far away!

    #174240
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Thomas – Were you required by the local jurisdiction to use irrigation or was it a request from the client?

    #174358
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Interesting system and solution. I see you are located in Hagerstown, which is only a few hours from me. Any local sites utilizing this set-up?

    #175770
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Here is the link to the website Irritrol has set up for the controller: <a href="http://http://www.irritrolsystems.com/pccontrol/“>. It has specs, a demo video, etc.

    #174898
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    I hope this helps and I am addressing your question.

    The canopies and plant density should be included with the calculation of coefficient factors, but the reference ET used should be the higher of the two.

    I typically use three books for reference that provide me with answers to 90% of questions I have throughout the year. They are the certified irrigation designer and landscape irrigation auditor reference manuals from the Irrigation Association and The Turf Irrigation Manual by Choate. I have read many others while attending school and throughout the years, but most usually provide too much theory and explanation than is necessary for most.

    I personally do not remember coming across any references for determining quickly irrigation demand decrease upon establishment. However, if I do I will make a point posting a link.

    #174362
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Any personal experience with the increase in humidity after watering an athletic field? In my area I have run into two schools of thought.
    1. It is necessary to avoid injury.
    2. It is not worth the expense because it makes the area so humid that if feels warmer.

    #177372
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    Netafim has a great calculator tool, available on their website, for calculating estimated GPM based on area of a drip zone.

    #177376
    Marc Kovach
    Participant

    I use Eagle Point and AutoCAD. However, I was trained on Eagle Point when I started out as an irrigation designer. When I started my company three years ago I reviewed and completed a design using Eagle Point, Land FX and RainCAD. Honestly, I thought all did what they promised. The deciding factor for me was that neither Land FX or RainCAD was any better than Eagle Point, and I really did not want to deal with the learning curve involved with running a new software.

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