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NJASLA: HISTORY OF THE CHAPTER, First 50 years: Who is Roy H. DeBoer?

Formed in 1964, the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects will be celebrating its 50-year anniversary in 2014.
 
In an effort to reaffirm the history of our Chapter, we would like to introduce you to some of our founding members. Attendees at the first meeting held in 1964 included:  Don Richardson, Paul Krarup, Ross Pell, Larry Dumont, Lu Miceli, John Weed, Richard Cripps, Elizabeth Pattee, Russ Butler, Al Dilischer, Max Heim, Roy H. DeBoer, Oliver Deakin, John Haleck and Jeff Hall.
 
Roy H. DeBoer (FASLA , Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers University) was the New Jersey Chapter’s fifth President. Roy earned his undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1955 and his Master of Science in Horticulture, Planning and Microclimate in 1959. Roy taught at Rutgers for 49 years, beginning in 1955. He was a faculty member in the Department of Horticulture and Forestry and created the Department of Landscape Architecture.
 
Roy has received numerous awards over the years, owing to his dedication and recognition as an educator and advocator of landscape architecture. In 2000, Roy DeBoer was the recipient of the First Jot D. Carpenter Memorial Prize and Medal given by the American Society of Landscape Architects. The award for landscape architecture educators was established in 2000 to honor the late Prof. Jot D. Carpenter, a long-time advocate for academic excellence and student involvement in the profession.
 
Roy’s dedication to landscape architectural education, students and the profession approaches legendary proportions, to the point that he is often referred to as the “Father of Landscape Architecture in New Jersey”. Roy DeBoer continues to give back to the students of landscape architecture by offering the Rutgers landscape architectural students an opportunity to discover and explore abroad through the Roy DeBoer Travel Prize.
 
Roy’s early and persuasive involvement in bringing licensure for the profession of landscape architecture in New Jersey, earned him the first certificate given out to a landscape architect in New Jersey and the nick name of our states “number one landscape architect”.
 
There were no “annual meetings” during the early years of the Chapter. A number of meetings were held each year, at various locations, mainly in Central Jersey, such as Collins Auditorium at Blake Hall on the Cook Campus and the Forsgate Country Club, off Exit 8A of the New Jersey Turnpike. Average attendance at these meetings was 50-60 members, but a few drew as many as 100 or more landscape architects.

Lead image via Ilonka Angalet, NJASLA President-Elect

NJASLA “Site Plan Rule” Petition Approved by All Three 3 State Boards

Rule Changes reflect 2008 LLA legislation
 
August 19, 2013 marks a GREEN Letter day for New Jersey Landscape Architects and the Garden State. A rulemaking petition revising the Site Plan Rule was officially accepted by the licensing boards of the land development professions. After the many years of failed attempts and incremental successes that led to this day, NJ LLAs now will have scope of practice regulations more on a par with our fellow professionals here and in other states (See the full text below). The petition will soon be published for public comment before being formally promulgated into rule. Many thanks to all our members and supporters who toiled in this garden in the past and continue to do so, today. The vision and persistence of NJASLA leadership has borne sweet fruit.

NEW JERSEY REGISTER
Copyright © 2013 by the New Jersey Office of Administrative Law
 
VOLUME 45, ISSUE 16
 
ISSUE DATE: AUGUST 19, 2013
 
PUBLIC NOTICES
 
LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY
DIVISION OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS
NEW JERSEY STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTS
NEW JERSEY STATE BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS
NEW JERSEY STATE BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL PLANNERS
 
45 N.J.R. 1971(a)
 
N.J.A.C. 13:27-7.3, 13:40-7.3, and 13:41-4.3
 
Notice of Final Action on Petition for Rulemaking
Preparation of Site Plan
Petitioner: New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects
 
Take notice that on April 4, 2013, the New Jersey State Boards of Architects, Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, and Professional Planners received a petition for rulemaking from Richard W. Gaeckle, Esq., counsel for petitioner, the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (NJASLA), a professional organization that is a chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects national organization. The petitioner requested an amendment to the current regulations at N.J.A.C. 13:27-7.3, 13:40-7.3, and 13:41-4.3, which comprise what is commonly and collectively known as the Site Plan Rule (Site Plan Rule). Under the current rule, only architects or engineers may locate proposed buildings and their relationship to the site and immediate environs on a site plan. The petitioner sought to have the Site Plan Rule amended to permit landscape architects to do this as well. Additionally, the petitioner sought a new rule permitting landscape architects, as well as architects and engineers, to include the grading of land and water forms, natural drainage and determination or related impacts, assessments, and problems of land disturbance including erosion and sedimentation, blight, or other hazards as part of the preparation of a site plan.
 
A notice acknowledging the Board’s receipt of the petition was filed with the Office of Administrative Law and was published in the New Jersey Register on May 6, 2013 at 45 N.J.R. 1190(b).
 
Take further notice that the State Board of Architects considered the petition for rulemaking at the open public session of its May 9, 2013 meeting, the State Board of Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors considered the petition at the open public session of its May 16, 2013 meeting, and the State Board of Professional Planners considered the petition at the open public session of its May 29, 2013 meeting. All three Boards determined that this matter should be referred for 90 days for further review and analysis of the issues raised by the petitioner. A notice of action on petition for rulemaking reflecting this determination was published on July 1, 2013 at 45 N.J.R. 1675(a).
 
Take further notice that the State Board of Architects considered the petition for rulemaking at the open public session of its July 11, 2013 meeting, the State Board of Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors considered the petition at the open public session of its July 18, 2013 meeting, and the State Board of Professional Planners considered the petition at the open public session of its July 24, 2013 meeting. All three Boards voted to grant the petition for rulemaking. The Boards agreed that the current Site Plan Rule is inconsistent with the landscape architects enabling statute as amended (P.L. 2008, c. 77) and that the Site Plan Rule should be amended to be consistent with the statute. A copy of this notice has been mailed to the petitioner consistent with the requirements of N.J.A.C. 1:30-4.2.

NJASLA First 50 years: Who is Luciano ‘Lu’ Miceli?

Prepared by John T. Duda, NJASLA Vice President

The New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects was formed in 1964. NJASLA will be celebrating its 50-year anniversary in 2014.

In an effort to reaffirm the history of our Chapter, I would like to introduce you to some of our founding members. Attendees at the first meeting held in 1964 included:  Don Richardson, Paul Krarup, Ross Pell, Larry Dumont, Lu Miceli, John Weed, Richard Cripps, Elizabeth Pattee, Russ Butler, Al Dilischer, Max Heim, Roy H. DeBoer, Oliver Deakin, John Haleck and Jeff Hall.

Parallel to the history on the NJASLA is that of the landscape architecture firm founded by Lu in 1964, which is one of – if not the – oldest Landscape Architectural firms in New Jersey.

Luciano Miceli, (FASLA), better known as Lu, was the third New Jersey Chapter President serving from 1969-1972. A graduate of the University of Georgia, class of 1961, Lu also studied at the State University of New York Farmingdale where he earned an Associate degree in Ornamental Horticulture in 1958. While at Farmingdale, he met his lifelong partner and wife, Joyce Peterson. Together, they now have 4 children and 7 grandchildren. 

After graduation from UGA, Lu and Joyce moved back to New York. Lu joined the engineering firm of Andrews and Clark and eventually moved on to work at the NYC Housing Authority for a brief period of time. He then joined Zion and Breen in New York City and worked on several of the firm’s notable projects including the 1964 Worlds Fair, the New York Museum of Modern Art and Paley Park. In 1964, he left Zion and Breen and together with John Andres and John Weed formed the firm Andres Miceli Weed, located in Rutherford, NJ.

During the early years Lu was extremely active in the NJASLA. He was instrumental in helping the organization grow and by initiating the NJASLA’s first attempt to get LA licensure by testifying numerous times in front of the state board. 

Early work at the firm was split between NYC projects and New Jersey. A number of strong relationships were forged with multi-discipline firms, architects and developers, such as the Grad Partnership, Roth/Johnson, Barry Ginsburg and Mitch Hirsch of Mack Developers, which served the firm well throughout the years. 

Major New Jersey projects included Spruce Run State Park, redevelopment of the Mercer-Jackson neighborhood in Trenton, St Peter’s Community Park in Newark and the Hackensack River Corridor plan. 

In 1967, Bruce Kulik joined the firm and had an immediate positive impact on the design direction and future success of the firm. Bruce’s strong design and graphic skills were a nice complement to Lu’s strong management and business skills. 

 

In the 1970’s the firm was heavily involved in the redevelopment of small urban and suburban downtowns as well as suburban office building campuses throughout the tri state area. Notable projects include Downtown Phoenixville Pa, Bangor Me, Wheeling WV, Chambersburg Pa and White Plains NY as well as numerous Mack and other office building projects in northern NJ. In the early 70’s major changes to the firm included Bruce Kulik becoming a partner in 1972, John Weed leaving the firm in 1974, and John Williams joining the firm in 1977. John is shown to the right of Lu Micelli in this photo taken at the ASLA Fellows Induction ceremony.

 

In the 80’s, with continued growth, the firm become involved in several large NYC parks projects including Cunningham Park, Clove Lakes, Flushing meadows Corona Park and the Flushing Bay Promenade. The firm’s longstanding relationship with the NYC dept of Parks continues on, even to this day. 

 

In 1995, recognizing their lifelong achievements Lu and partner Bruce Kulik were elected fellows by the ASLA for their contributions to the profession in the built works category. 

 

The 1990’s and 2000’s also saw big changes with longtime associate John Williams becoming a Partner in 1988 and Lu stepping down and retiring from active practice in 1996. The firm also suffered the untimely loss of Bruce Kulik in 2000. New partners, Allen Juba, John Duda and Linda Barrie Gumeny were added in 2002 to help manage the firms ever growing and complex work load and project list such as, the Hudson River Park, the Atlantic City Corridor, and Dallas Children’s Adventure Garden. This core group carrying on the firm that Lu began in 1964 is now known as MKW+Associates and still operates out of the same location on Park Avenue in Rutherford, NJ. During its history, the firm has produced numerous NJASLA Presidents and other Executive Committee Members, Trustees and general members. 

 

Complementing his office activities, Lu was an instructor, lecturer and visiting critic at the Department of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers and the Department of Architecture at NJIT, as well as being a member of the advisory board at NJIT Dept of Architecture. Lu has also authored numerous articles and spoken extensively on many topics concerning Landscape architecture and Urban Design. Since his retirement, Lu and Joyce have enjoyed traveling, spending winters in their Florida home and enjoying time with their family.

 

This is the third in a series of articles about the history of the NJASLA. The series is being authored in celebration of the 50 year anniversary of the ASLA New Jersey Chapter. For more information about #NJASLA50, visit the NJASLA website at www.njasla.org.

NJASLA: HISTORY OF THE CHAPTER — First 50 years: Who is Elizabeth Greenleaf Pattee?

Prepared by Ilonka Angalet (NJASLA President-Elect), with collaboration from Sean Ryan and Susanne Smith Meyer (President NH Granite Chapter ASLA)

The New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects was formed in 1964. NJASLA will be celebrating its 50-year anniversary in 2014.
 
In an effort to reaffirm the history of our Chapter, I would like to introduce you to some of our founding members. Attendees at the first meeting held in 1964 included:  Don Richardson, Paul Krarup, Ross Pell, Larry Dumont, Lou Miceli, John Weed, Richard Cripps, Elizabeth Pattee, Russ Butler, Al Dilischer, Max Heim, Roy H. DeBoer, Oliver Deakin, John Haleck and Jeff Hall. The single female attendee was Elizabeth Pattee, who, even while nearing the end of her own 50 year career, remained a passionate supporter of the landscape architecture profession.
 
Elizabeth Greenleaf Pattee (1893-1991) earned her degree in architecture at MIT in 1916. Prior to establishing her own residential landscape architectural practice in 1922 in MA, Pattee and Peters (Constance E. Peters), she was employed by Stone and Webster in MA. She also taught at the Lowthorpe School of Landscape Architecture, Gardening and Horticulture for Women in Groton, Massachusetts also obtaining a second degree in landscape architecture from the School in 1918. Founded in 1901 by Mrs. Gilchrist Low, this was the first school of Landscape Architecture to be established in America for women.
 
In 1945 the Lowthorpe School merged with the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where Elizabeth taught between 1945 -63 and headed the Landscape Architectural department between 1946-52 and 1955-59. She is recognized as the landscape designer of Killian (Great) Court at MIT and the Kimball-Jenkins Estate Garden (1929) in NH, where the formal perennial garden has been restored and maintained at what is now an educational historic site and community art school.
 
While on the RISD faculty, Pattee wrote numerous articles for professional publications became involved in public open spaces, housing and city planning and was actively involved in the International Federation of Landscape Architects, AIA and the ASLA. She was elected an ASLA Fellow in 1961. Generally, her work was practical and followed the trends of the time, using plant material to integrate architecture into the landscape.
 
She was married to Arthur Coleman Comey (HGSD 07, FASLA) landscape architect and city planner and professor and author of “Transition Zoning” 1933. She retired to Hightstown, NJ.
 
More about Elizabeth Greenleaf Pattee can be found in: Shaping the American Landscape: new profiles from the pioneers of American landscape design  C. Birmbaum & S. Foel, the Cultural Landscape Foundation.
 
This is the second in a series of articles about the history of the NJASLA. The series is being authored in celebration of the 50 year anniversary of the ASLA New Jersey Chapter. For more information about #NJASLA50, visit the NJASLA website at www.njasla.org.

NJASLA’s First 50 Years: Who was Oliver A. Deakin?

Prepared by Ilonka Angalet (NJASLA President-Elect), with collaboration from Roy DeBoer (FASLA) and David Earl (ASLA)

The New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects was formed in 1964. NJASLA will be celebrating its 50-year anniversary in 2014.  In an effort to reaffirm the history of our Chapter, I would like to introduce you to some of our founding members. Attendees at the first meeting held in 1964 included:  Don Richardson, Paul Krarup, Ross Pell, Larry Dumont, Lou Miceli, John Weed, Richard Cripps, Elizabeth Pattee, Russ Butler, Al Dilischer, Max Heim, Roy H. DeBoer, Oliver Deakin, John Haleck and Jeff Hall.

Oliver A. Deakin (FASLA) was the first New Jersey Chapter President. He also served as President of the NY Chapter of ASLA between 1958-1961. He was a Rutgers graduate (1929), and went on to Harvard Graduate School of Design to earn his MLA degree.  He was the (Landscape and) Parkway Engineer for the New Jersey Department of Roads and Highways (now NJDOT) for 27 years, and was on the design team for the original 16 mile segment of the Garden State Parkway, extending from the Raritan River north to the Union toll plaza. His involvement represented the first time that a landscape architect was involved in the alignment of a major “parkway” in the U.S. Oliver Deakin gained national and international recognition for his role in creating the first national standards for highway aesthetics and making the Garden State Parkway an example of excellence in parkway design that the world could emulate. He served the public sector as a landscape architect during his entire professional career.

As Parkway Engineer for New Jersey, he was one of the chief collaborators of the Garden State Parkway Planning and Design team. He prepared the preliminary studies and sketches of the right-of-way and prepared the construction design documents that included grading plans, planting plans, cross sections, elevations, cost estimates, details and specifications. He worked with the construction division during the Parkway construction in the performance of: selective thinning, clearing and protecting existing trees and shrubs in the right-of-way, rough grading, finish grading, seeding, nursery inspections, planting operations and the inspections of architectural features.

In addition to his career with New Jersey Roads and Highways, he was a member of the following:  The American Civic and Planning Association, Society of American Foresters, the American Holly Society, NJ Federation of Shade Tree Commissioners, Chairman of ASLA Committee on Public Roads, Controlled Access Highways and Parkways, Rutgers College of Agriculture Turf Advisory Committee and Secretary AASHO Committee on Roadside Development.

Deakin participated in the Horace Brown Lecture Series at Stevens Institute of Technology on Landscape Design and its Relation to the Modern Highway and co-authored the book The Highway and the Landscape.

This is the first in a series of articles about the history of the NJASLA. The series is being authored in celebration of the 50 year anniversary of the ASLA New Jersey Chapter. For more information about #NJASLA50, visit the NJASLA website at www.njasla.org.

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