Fined for Pruning a Tree

Viewing 9 posts - 31 through 39 (of 39 total)
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  • #162503
    Rob Halpern
    Participant

    I’d like to think that I can cut down any tree in my yard as long as it is not in a wetland buffer. ..

    You know, so would I. As long as all my neighbors don’t also cut down their trees.

    #162502
    Mark Lerch
    Participant

    I agree with the person on the article comments with the Observer, if the Crapes were planted to meet minimum code requirements and that is why the Forester is enforcing the pruning fine, it may require questioning whether these trees ever should have been approved as minimum code trees in the first place. It is my experience that many business’s choose to plant these trees because they are one of the few trees that allow the maximum amount of visibility of their business or building while meeting the requirements of accent trees for minimum code. It doesn’t hurt that they are also deciduous in an area that has a preponderance of evergreen trees. I have seen all species of trees topped in SW Florida and it is only a coincidence that in the case of the article the trees that were pruned were Crapes. Property owners rights advocates know no limits when it comes to species and it could have been any tree.¬† Crapes are more forgiving than others and will tolerate severe pruning but it doesn’t mean that it is good for the tree. I recently attended an extension service presentation on Crape Myrtles alone and it was very clear that this type of pruning is irreversible in its damage to the overall structure of the tree.

    #162501
    Heather Smith
    Participant

    hehe

    #162500
    Heather Smith
    Participant

    I totally agree Jason. I think these sorts of scenarios…if we take it at face value…actually harm the idea of thoughtful site planning. No, I don’t know anything about pruning trees…nada, zilch…and I have no problem with minimum planting requirements(that are often pretty weak anyway). But I think that as professionals in a field that encourages analysis and inventory of individual properties it would be far more beneficial to take these things on a case by case issue rather then pretending a blanket requirement meets all needs in a municipality.

    Yes, even here in Idaho we have minimum planting requirements and mandatory beds b/w sidewalks and parking lots. I know when Jon rides his horse to work it is really hard pulling all of those plants behind. ūüėČ

    #162499
    Trace One
    Participant

    Heather, dear, like I wrote,  it is by community generally РI picked up one site plan requirement from a google search for the entire state.

    Big atlanta suburbs also have minimal, i mean site boundaries and the check, end of story, type requirements..The ordinance, as arrived at, is political, historical, depends on citizen involvement..

    And there is enourmous variety across the country..

    but if you enjoy riding your draft horses down the highway  to your landscape jobs, more power to you..sounds like fun to me..

    #162498
    Trace One
    Participant

    thanks, Andrew, that was so sweet!

    #162497
    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I sent an email to both the reporter and the UF this morning. Neither has responded (I imagine that their emails might be a bit full). Almost 2,500 people have commented on the newspaper’s article and over 7,000 “like” it on Facebook.

    That much interest ought to have lead to follow up reports.

    #162496
    Heather Smith
    Participant

    Is this an episode of Mad Men?

    #162495
    Josiah Lockard
    Participant

    As an Arborist, I unfortunately deal with “crape murder” on a routine basis. I doubt this will pose a safety hazard in Crape Myrtles like it would in other species. However, it is aesthetically damaging and unnecessary. Crape Myrtles can be managed to almost any size with proper pruning. The fine does seem a bit severe for an ornamental tree. The article states that the tree was pruned beyond repair. I have had many experiences where Crape Myrtles, that were repeatedly topped, were able to be repaired by cutting them to the ground and allowing them to resprout. In the following season the the sprouts are thinned to 4-5 dominate stems. Within one year of cutting them down we¬†have a brand new 7 foot Crape Myrtle that can be managed to the proper size in the future.

Viewing 9 posts - 31 through 39 (of 39 total)
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