Hunting

Home Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION Hunting

This topic contains 1 reply, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  Thomas J. Johnson 7 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 64 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #163580

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    In this market, does anyone need to advertise? I’m a one person part time stealthy operation and people somehow find me to send resumes from time to time. … email resumes.

     

    Geographically, DC looks more active than most metropolitan areas.

    #163579

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    Keep in mind the density of firms around DC. I think DC region (particularly Alexandria, VA) has the highest concentration of firms including large & big name firms of anywhere in the nation. Thats one reason why I live here. So, of course, there would be the most numbers of openings for a geographic region, but there is also the highest concentration of LAs perhaps anywhere in the nation as well. There is a lot of competition. I’ve seen a number of the postions advertised before, if not several times, so who knows if they are just speculative (meaning, dependant on contracts) or they are just trolling.

     

    The positions are almost all just above entry level (2-4 yrs) as well. I also know from my networking that things are not all that rosy in the area. Many firms in DC are heavily federal government contract dependant, and much of that money has seriously dried up. I know a few gov’t positions I had applied for were just cancelled due to funding being pulled.  Local governments (state/county/city) have also cut way back as these entities are having some substantial lay-offs.

    #163578

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I did not men to imply that there was a lot of hiring going on, but wanted to support my earlier point that in general, where real estate values are doing better, our profession is doing better. Washington, DC was the only metro area with increasing real estate values in a recent publication. I’d suggest to anyone planning on moving that (s)he should look at real estate value trends as part of the investigation. When land has increasing value, we have increasing value,

     

    #163577

    Chris Markham, RLA
    Participant

    Keep in touch, we may be in search of a LA in Grand Rapids Michian.

    #163576

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    Perhaps you could list some details of the specific jobs that would entice one to the nursery industry.

     

    This is going to sound a little bit like “what’s wrong with my ficus?” at a cocktail party to a lot of people. Is there a specific job description that you know of?

    #163575

    Craig A Raines
    Participant

    Have you tried Viagra?…….

    #163574

    Lee Attinger
    Participant

    If you want a job it’s really simple, find a different career. I’ll pass on the $30k/year entry level position.

    #163573

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    I’m changing careers, too. I’m going to be a professional panhandler. I’n not even qualified to man the deep fryer at the McDonalds as I no habla espaniol good, and here, that is a prerequisite.

    #163572

    Thomas J. Johnson
    Participant

    Hey, I work at a nursery right now. It’s all I can find. I’m not making much, especially with the commute, but I’m learning my plants, getting a nice tan, getting in better shape, meeting interesting people and having fun. I don’t see how you can be a landscape architect without having some hands-on knowledge of the plants you’re using in your designs.

    #163571

    Boilerplater
    Participant

    What kind of jobs do they have that utilize planner skills, nr?  I was thinking of responding to one of those ads looking for people to work on oil rigs!

    #163570

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I respect what you are doing for sure.

    I’ve worked in a few myself, but I don’t think you are looking at it as a career. I doubt if you are feeling like your landscape architecture knowledge is being applied as Katherine implies. It is definitely adding to your education, but not so much on the application unless you have an unusual situation.  

    It is a great step along the way not only to be more involved with plants, but also you start to learn what and how lay people think in terms of landscape.

    Great experience, but it is much more continuing ed than application of your degree.

     

     

    #163569

    It’s not your talent, it’s the pay grade….at least that’s what I’m finding.  They want my years/experience for first year pricing, which is well below the cost of living here (high!)

    #163568

    mauiBob
    Participant

    In my 12 years of experience in landscape architecture, I have yet to work with someone who’s been with the same company for longer than 15 years. How’s that for stability in this field? Principals have left their positions to start new firms or join another. The lone exception is the Principal/Owner/Founder.

    I’m fortunate to be currently working in a full-time position, but nothing is guaranteed long term. My side jobs doing final, presentation illustrations and investing in the stock market take up equivalent to full-time. This is by no means boasting, but my investments the last 12 years have made more $$$ than my jobs in landscape architecture combined!! We’re talking triple figures more. Of course it helps when you believed in Apple, Netflix and eBay. If you rely on just a landscape income, you’ll encounter these economic roller coaster rides. 

    If I could do it all over again, I’d say No Thank you to landscape architecture. Become a financial planner or something in the Finance field and do my illustrations as a paying hobby. 

    Anyone see the advertised position in ASLA for an opening in South Carolina? Where can you find a person who can effectively speak to the media, understand legal and governmental procedures, knowledge of flora and fauna in SC, knowledge of wildlife biology, proficient in arcGIS and Autocad…and have 4 to 6 years of experience…Is that a joke? Then to top it off with that salary is beyond delutional! I can identify 4 to 5 professions to fit their one job description.

    #163567

    Craig A Raines
    Participant

    I concur. I remember a professor of mine, Dan Moribato U of Idaho, once said to the class “If you won’t get rich practicing Landscape Architecture” So True….I have been through two major economic downturns and am now only somewhat comfortable financialy. With this said I would do it again this time only differently…….If you want stability look elsewhere why even the old fallback goverment positions are not a lock anymore.

    The reason that you do not see people with companies for very long is they do not encourage it as their is always talent waiting to prove. The profession is not all that difficult to master.

     

     

    #163566

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    It does not pay well as a job. It can pay well as a business, but the mechanism for making that money is business ability rather than ability to design.

    People don’t stay long as employees with a particular company because because they always feel like they maxed out their position and they want to continue to grow, even if it means a re-start.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 64 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Lost Password

Register