Any solution for the sharp ends on rolled steel edging overlaps?

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION Any solution for the sharp ends on rolled steel edging overlaps?

This topic contains 1 reply, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Nikolaos Miller 7 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #166522

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    I have been searching for a solution to control the sharp edges on overlapped rolled steel edging in the landscape. Most projects are not an issue but when dealing with small residential installations, it is still a hazard to little feet or paws.

     

    Any bright ideals?

     

    Thanks in advance.

    #166536

    Nikolaos Miller
    Participant

    Are the sharp edges being caused by pounding the edging in during install?

    #166535

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    That is a good question to which I don’t have an answer. I am usually not on site during the installs. I’ll have to ask our construction lead.

    #166534

    Nikolaos Miller
    Participant

    On residential jobs I avoided getting those sharp edges by loosing up the soil with a pick along the path of the edger and putting a wood block on top of the edger to beat on with the hand sledge. This added some time to install it, but we avoided lawsuits due to a pet or kid cutting their feet/paws on it.

    #166533

    A spade cut bed edge reduces your project cost and eliminates your problem all together.

    #166532

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    How are you connecting the steel? Are you overlapping it to allow for expansion and reduction for heat or are you solidly connecting?

    If you are overlapping, you could cut a 2 or 3″ radius on the upper corners of both strips and grind the edges so that there is no point or cut edge when they move.

    I either had them welded or used manufatured edging that were made to connect (back in the day) , so I never did what I just described.

    #166531

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    Thank you Nikolaos. I will have to do some investigating on the current methods of installation.

    #166530

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    Hi Dennis,
    yes that is my personal favorite on edging choices… but does not always work as a low maintenence/low cost choice for a separation barrier between sod/mulch, sod/rock, etc. Especially when dealing with slopes.

    #166529

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    Andrew, the edges are currently being overlapped about 6 inches and then rounded U-shaped stakes are used to hold them in place. Welding is not an option as it is too cost prohibitive. Grinding would certainly work, but would also fall on the costly side for this type of application.

    #166528

    Thomas J. Johnson
    Participant

    +1 for Spade

    or baring that…

    +1 for Grind. Flesh will still lose to steel, even if it’s rounded, with enough force, such as kids playing, running, falling on it…

    You got me thinking though (always a dangerous situation) and I may have something for you…

    #166527

    Tanya Olson
    Participant

    I use trex or other composite bender board instead of steel on projects with animals….

    #166526

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    You are losing me Melanie. Is it the rounded “U-shaped” stakes that are posing the hazard or the right angle at the top end of the steel?

    How low is the budget that you can’t take a few minutes to grind the corner down? If it is that low, you really do need to seek an alternative material because the safety issue has to come first.

    #166525

    Melanie Reber, RLA
    Participant

    Sorry about that… it is the top of the end of the edging itself that is too sharp. I honestly don’t know if it is due to a poor cut in the edging or simply an istallation issue. I will have to find out. I really don’t like the way they look overlapped anyway, so I suppose I am looking for a better solution to the whole finish of this type of edging. A premade cover for the overlap portion only or something similiar.

    I agree that safety is primary and that is why I am asking for suggestions. I’m just not too convinced that grinding is THE answer here. Even on small projects, we may be installing several hundred LF. If we were to go back and remove the stakes after installtion at each 10′ interval and grind each corner… sorry, but that just doesn’t seem like a practical answer. It may very well BE the answer… but before I concede, I would just like to know about other options. ( I DO appreciate your help)

    I also like Trex benderboard Tanya, but for some odd reason, it just isn’t popular here in Colorado.

    #166524

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    That is a bit of work as a retro-fix, but it really is not too bad for future work. Have you looked at permlok or other manufactured metal edging? It sounds like you are using plain steel strips with hooked stkes to hold them. I’d expect that they will be all over the place between summer heat and freeze/thaw.How has this faired over the years other than the sharp corners?

    We’ve always either welded them to rebar set below the edge or used one of the manufactured edges. You pay more for the manufactured stuff, but save on the labor and get good performance out of it.

    #166523

    Kimberly
    Participant

    I have similar questions and am looking into this: http://www.borderconcepts.com/products/browse/steel-edge-iron-edge. Is it similar to what you have been using that has been producing sharp edges? 

    I started a thread here because I’m trying to talk my boss into using steel edging on a project, but I’m concerned with safety and so is he. 

    https://land8.com/forum/topics/steel-edging

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Lost Password

Register