Architects venturing further into landscape design…

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION Architects venturing further into landscape design…

This topic contains 1 reply, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  Richard Longman 8 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 69 total)
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  • #160490

    Albert C
    Participant

    I received an email from the San Francisco AIA  the first sentence in the description to this event is,”As architects venture further into landscape design…” . The event is a two hour “class” moderated/ taught by two architects and a hyped urban nursery going over planting arranging, cant wait to hear from architects who go to this. My cynical view $30 bucks and 2 hours and you too can do landscape design!

     

     

    http://ac11beyondequisetum.eventbrite.com/

    #160558

    Richard Longman
    Participant

    So the options are we can let architects forget about the exterior landscape until the hour before permitting, at which time they call and ask to get it “shrubbed up” or they can start thinking about it earlier.

    I think we should pay them the $30 and let them see its more than just a 2 hr. skill.

    #160557

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    Next up? hardscape! Man…what CAN’T them architects do?

    #160556

    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    “Its Only Four Walls and a Roof” — An architectural design seminar by landscape architects.

    #160555

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant
    “Architecture is the art of how to waste space.”  – Phillip Johnson
    #160554

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    If they can beat us at our game for a particular project, they are either good, or there is not much of “our skills” that are needed for the project. Either way, I don’t think there is any good reason to feel like a victim over it.

     

    So many are always complaining that the landscape is under appreciated, but whenever it gets appreciated by other design professionals they cry foul. If architects are venturing further into the landscape, let’s hope that they get educated in it and learn from their experiences so that they can do it well. At least they are taking the initiative to learn … isn’t that what most of us did?

     

    Most of us came out of nowhere to learn about landscape architecture and moved forward gaining through our experiences doing it. Why do we think that it is inherently bad if someone came from somewhere else professionally, developed an interest, studied, and pursued the same interests that we do? Is there a laboratory somewhere that sucks out a persons ability to design landscapes effectively that architects are sent to upon licensure? … is it the same lab that sucks out our ability to know anything about plants that so many contractors and gardeners think we get sent to?

     

    Why does this make so many feel impotent? I’ve seen this reaction for years and years and it really makes no sense. If they suck and take work from you, what does that say about you? If the type of work that they do is below your dignity, why fret because you did not get a chance to do what you don’t want to do? If they do a better job than me or you, we better step it up. If their jobs can be done with minimal skill, they don’t need me or you so lets find some other projects that do need us.

     

    #160553

    Nic Wurzbacher
    Participant

    After 30 years of being a general contractor and landscape and pool contractor and now going to get my arch degree im going for both that way it gets built the way i want. Everyone here cries but wont step up,oooooohhhh those bastards…………….get thr f ………….ova it bunch a kiitttties !

    #160552

    Rick Spalenka
    Participant

    I don’t think it’s a matter of architects venturing into landscape design as it is architects venturing into the ability to stamp and sidestep the landscape architect.  For example, until the recent municipal code change in our local city, architects were doing it all.  They thought what they did looked nice and the clients and public thought what was designed is what gets designed.  After the new code that required a landscape architect stamp I was asked to “landscape” a small office and received the drawings from the architect with his landscape (and hardscape) design.  Needless to say, it looked like cr$p but the sad thing is, maybe, it was only I who recognized it as such.  Fact: 50% of the human race is below average intelligence and the other 50% is too busy to learn to recognize cr$p when they see it.  All you have to do is look at our elected politicians.

    #160551

    nca
    Participant

    I’ve come to find that if you are a designer you can design anything. It’s only design. People that rely on titles probably have reason to feel threatened.

     

    Then again, I also agree that architects can be difficult to work with, but so can engineers, planners, and other landscape architects for the same reasons.Design is design is design. If you’re good and study/work hard and know your shit, you’ve got little to worry about.

    #160550

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    LIKE

    #160549

    Tanya Olson
    Participant

    I’m with you there. Plus, if architects keep their noses out of the landscape then how can I stick my nose into the architecture? 

    #160548

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    I agree to a point. If you are good at design, then you can stand a pretty good shot at designing almost anything. However, that doesn’t meant you have an apitiude for a particular type of design.

     

    As always, it comes down to the details. I have found that when architects try to design landscapes or even hardscapes, they really can’t do the detailing properly. They are even taught incorrectly in architecture schools (I’ve seen it first hand) Often using the worst materials available and poor install techniques, or just poor design theory. It may look nice, but it is uncomfortable for users or does not function properly. Just like I can theoretically design a building, I would not want to be responsible for steel load calutations or designing a roof system so it doesn’t leak. All disciplines have gotten so complicated that it really does take a specialist to design and execute the project properly.

    #160547

    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    wow, great and inspiring post.

    #160546

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I don’t think anyone is saying that all architects can design all landscapes. Nick said “if you work hard and know your $hit” as a qualifier. It looks like this seminar is to try to help them know a little more $hit.

     

    This is a tough time for people building as well. They are making decisions based on expense. They may see the value in a better landscape, but they may simply not have the budget. It seems logical that they would turn to their architect or engineer to whip off a landscape plan. In fact I have experienced this directly several times in the last couple of years working in a local engineering office.

     

    I have also drawn up floor plans and elevations for commercial buildings for developers to get plans through early permitting in order to show prospective buyers or lessees that a project is approved through much of the process. When it goes further, an architect is hired and a real building is drawn up.

     

    The point is that I believe that a lot of this is client driven and the architects are having to respond rather than them going around “taking our work”. If that is the case, wouldn’t you want them to have a little more knowledge?

     

    The assumption is that if they don’t do it, we will get it and be able to do it right. That is not necessarilly true.

    #160545

    nca
    Participant

    Jason, I agree.

     

    Maybe my statement was too broad. Maybe I would say design is design..until something needs to get built.

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