Architects venturing further into landscape design…

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION Architects venturing further into landscape design…

This topic contains 1 reply, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  Richard Longman 8 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 69 total)
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  • #160529

    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Architecture and Engineering have the advantage of being established for hundreds of years before Landscape Architecture. We are trying to take work from them as far as some of them are concerned. I find that it’s the smaller isolated municipalities that want Architects and Engineers to stamp site work. They’ll eventually get the message. I’m surprised at the number of them now requiring a Landscape Architect’s stamp for site plant approval.

     

    Personally, I think the best projects are the result of all of the members of the design team having input. If the Architect is the lead, I feel my vision of the landscape on a project should be in tune with his/her vision of the overall project. That’s probably the best way to achieve a strong ‘indoor/outdoor” relationship. And I have no problem with creating a landscape that humans want to be in that jives with the pragmatic nature of the engineer. To me that’s the fun part of being an LA.

     

    That said, I also know when to push back.   

    #160528

    Alan Ray, RLA
    Participant

    …and where is ASLA?

    #160527

    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    who?

    #160526

    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Ahem, that would be the organization that has gladly taken my checks over the years. It’s also the organization that has convinced me that I’m missing out on something by not sending them a check earlier this year. Everything has been o.k. so far, but I do miss LAM big-time.  

    #160525

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    In Washington, DC.

    #160524

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    You can get it for $60 on recycled trees, or $44 digital without a membership. Expensive…yes, but cheaper than a membership.

    #160523

    Heather Smith
    Participant

    I still think the approach by an LA/LD and architect would probably come out different…design aside. I remember an architecture professor that taught Urban Theory at UI showing pictures of neighborhoods Olmsted had helped design. There were beautiful homes but he paused to say the tree lined streets were enough to “almost” (he said this with a laugh) make you want to become an LA. I don’t feel threatened by architects dipping their toes into planting design because I think landscape architecture is about so much more then that. LAs are really about the relationship of people with their environment, whereas architects are often ( I don’t want to say all of them!) about design for design’s sake…highlighting the appearance of the building vs. the use of the building. If LAs can create a feeling with the space they design they have no need to worry about other professionals being able to choose the correct plants. Heck, I see home gardeners with beautiful plants here in town…it still isn’t up to what a talented LA can do.

    #160522

    Albert C
    Participant

    Flora Grubb Gardens is a retail garden store plants, pots, furnishing, gifts, coffee, etc. in a up in coming neighborhood(Dog Patch). Not a LA firm. That name, good press and when “gardens are your life” this can get you places in bay area. link to the website:
    http://floragrubb.com/idx/index.php

    #160521

    Albert C
    Participant

    Flora Grubb Gardens is a retail garden store plants, pots, furnishing, gifts, coffee, etc. in a up in coming neighborhood(Dog Patch). Not a LA firm. That name, good press and when “gardens are your life” this can get you places in bay area. link to the website:

    http://floragrubb.com/idx/index.php

    #160520

    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I don’t lose sleep over architects, engineers, landcape contractors, or little old ladies designing landscapes. I do what I do – some people buy it some people don’t. When I can’t sell it, I’ll adjust.

    #160519

    Heather Smith
    Participant

    Isn’t that the truth? Adjust to reality and we will all be fine.

    #160518

    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    It’s pretty much all true where I’m concerned, except for the part about not knowing plant material, claiming the ability to do your job as a planner, never listening, focusing on flashy graphics. Horticulturalist and LAs look at plants in completely different ways. The Horticulturalist primary concern is the plant, where my primary concerned is the place, which means I might push the limits of what’s good for the plant if it enhances the human experience. If I’m trying to create a low hedge with dwarf boxwood, more than likely I’ll call for them to be planted 42” to 48” o.c. Against the 5 plus feet the Hort would probably recommend. After years of paying attention to the plants in my palette, I know just how far I can push things.

     

    Really, don’t you understand we’re creative folks? Our focus is on creating places that people want to be in. My goal is to design pleasing spaces that work. It’s not that LA/LDs can’t interpret ordinances and codes; it’s that we’re trying to do our job with sensitivity and on a scale that most planners can’t relate to. I have nothing but props for Planners and like most LAs have no interest in doing their job. I just wish some of them were more flexible and not so by the book. Every site is different.  

     

    As one of those terrible writers you mentioned, I can proudly say that I have been able to design well enough to feed myself for a very long time. I might write a horrible report, but I smart enough to know I should have someone else write it for me while I do what I do best.  

    #160517

    Instead of complaining about how architects have done you wrong, if you are in the bay area, why don’t you pay the $30 dollars and go to the event.  It might be a great way to network with several architecture firms and get some of the work you desire.  Listen to what Flora Grubb has to offer.  I’m sure this is a big marketing push for her.  You can listen and offer up your own advice, show them the value of using a Landscape Architect on all of their projects.  Collectively we need to stop being so negative and try and turn the tables in a positive way.

    #160516

    Albert C
    Participant

    starts at 3 on a Friday, got to see what the schedule looks like and see if the boss into letting me check it out

     

    #160515

    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    An LA/Hort background is great, but that’s just one path to being a good landscape architect. I think it’s foolish to think that LAs and LDs that don’t have a Hort degree can’t know a lot about plants.

     

    I happen to know a lot about plants, but not so much that I wouldn’t seek advice from an Arborist or Horticulturist or even a good Landscape Contractor of course. An LA has to know what they don’t know.

     

    I’m starting to think that there might be a shortage of good LAs in your area.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 69 total)

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