Design Software

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Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #3561140

    Just a P.S…….There are approx. 8 Landscape Architects who have posted to this Forum. Talking highly of “autoCAD” as well as other “computer generated software programs”……yet, looking at everyone’s Profiles, I’m seeing ZERO “Work Samples”…except for Bob Luther (nice work, BTW).

    I just believe it would be helpful to other Landscape Architects here on Land 8…..to actually SEE…examples of “autoCAD drawings Photo Shop, Sketch Up, 3D Computer Renderings, etc. LA’s here on LAND 8 can’t see and learn from me with respect to “autoCAD”,…AS 100% of the projects I show on my LAND 8 Profile are all…”Hand Drawn”.

    #3561158
    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    “Whether drawings are created using “autoCAD” or “Drawn by Hand”……both the Design and the quality of the drawings need to be “outstanding”! Creativity, Strong Graphics, Good Line Weights, etc…High Quality Design & Graphics, regardless of the method/s you use should be a high priority, IMO.”

    I’m not sure why it is. Maybe it is the computer age. Maybe it is all of the different players in the design and permitting process, but there is definitely less value placed on the quality of drawings. Drawings had more purposes in many cases in the past than they do now. I think there is more separation from the home or property owner and the drawings, perhaps.

    I know that in my case the homeowners are not that interested in being dazzled by the appearance of the drawings and much more trusting in the design teams (or I’d be out of work). Whether that is from looking at built work by the different members or by trusting in reputation I am not sure. It may also be that there are so many things they are dealing with in the process of building their homes that it is too overwhelming. They seem much more focused on the end product than the appearance of the plans.

    Some of that disconnect is that they rely heavily on either their architect or builder to manage things for them.

    I’m not saying it is a good thing. I’m just saying that we have to play the game as the game is being played and not how we wish the game is being played.

    #3561160
    J. Nielsen
    Participant

    Procreate or Morpholio for IPad for sketching and process work. (trace layers)
    Sketchup for 3D mapping that can be drawn over later
    Photoshop for Entourage and collaging
    Illustrator for finalizing drawings, lettering and to produce vectors
    InDesign or PowerPoint for product assembly
    AutoCAD w/LandFX for CD Sets

    I am liking the IPad. It allows for hand media, but directly to digital. It is also portable and takes pictures that can be sketched on while onsite with a client and later worked on in the studio.

    #3561161
    J. Nielsen
    Participant

    Most of the AutoCAD stuff I have been tasked with, line-weights and parameters are preset by the firm and I, as a designer, have no say in them. It does what it is told and is happy to do so. I believe you are correct that the quality of drawings is no longer a priority, especially when most renderings are done in Photoshop. I am not saying it is right, It just is.

    Interestingly, in Europe I have been seeing a shift away from cookie-cutter Photoshop rendering back to more “Hand Drawn” media. Technology is catching up to being able to quickly produce digital media that was once only done by painstakingly hand.

    #3561166

    Well…I have seen some Photoshop renderings that have “very flat color…almost looks like paint by number”. But, yes, maybe it doesn’t matter so much any longer that we need to impress Clients with a “Color Rendering”…but, it actually does help Clients to “understand” the design IDEAS better.

    And, I totally understand that “autoCAD” is where the LA profession has been for many years. But, I’ve seen way too many “autoCAD” drawings where maybe only (1 or 2) line weights were used…very difficult to read & understand those drawings. A variety of “line weights” makes a huge different, whether it’s “autoCAD” or “Hand Drawn”. What’s important, I believe, is that the Contractors can easily read and understand the Contract Documents (for biding & construction purposes). I also have a bit of an issue with the “autoCAD” plant symbols. I’ve seen plans that have 40 to 50 “plant symbols” on a Plant Key. The LA understands them, of course, but, IMO, I believe there will be Landscape Contractors who might be “confused” in the field…making SURE they’re planting the correct plants/trees where they’re designated to be planted. Personally, I have always felt that using “leader lines” and an abbreviated Plant name like “TCM” Tree Crapemyrtle with a quantity, like (5)…is clearer for Landscape Contract Laborers to understand. Communication of ALL Contract Documents is KEY.

    #3561167
    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    And, I totally understand that “autoCAD” is where the LA profession has been for many years. But, I’ve seen way too many “autoCAD” drawings where maybe only (1 or 2) line weights were used…very difficult to read & understand those drawings. A variety of “line weights” makes a huge different, whether it’s “autoCAD” or “Hand Drawn”. What’s important, I believe, is that the Contractors can easily read and understand the Contract Documents (for biding & construction purposes). I also have a bit of an issue with the “autoCAD” plant symbols. I’ve seen plans that have 40 to 50 “plant symbols” on a Plant Key. The LA understands them, of course, but, IMO, I believe there will be Landscape Contractors who might be “confused” in the field…making SURE they’re planting the correct plants/trees where they’re designated to be planted. Personally, I have always felt that using “leader lines” and an abbreviated Plant name like “TCM” Tree Crapemyrtle with a quantity, like (5)…is clearer for Landscape Contract Laborers to understand. Communication of ALL Contract Documents is KEY.

    100% agree. I don’t usually do leader lines to plants because I almost always have single sheet plans and already have a ton of text with leaders, but I do agree that it is much easier for the contractors to have them. Line weights make a huge difference in readability as well as the aesthetics of the plan.

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