Difference between B.L.Arch and B.S.L.Arch

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums EDUCATION Difference between B.L.Arch and B.S.L.Arch

This topic contains 1 reply, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  nca 2 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #175194

    Will Richardson
    Participant

    does anyone know what the difference is?

    #175212

    nca
    Participant

    CSU is a bsla program. We’re within the school of agriculture and alot of what we study actually focuses toward the sciences such as plant biology, ecology, etc. I’m not sure how different that is from a program in an arch college, but thats my experience.

    -n

    #175211

    Will Richardson
    Participant

    OK, That makes sense. I have a BLA from the University of Idaho and the majority of our study focused on design and the technical aspects of LA such as CD’s, stormwater, grading, drainage… we had one 2 semester plants class, one soil class, one ecoloy class, one biology class, and maybe a couple other sciences, but most of it was design studio and technical stuff.

    #175210

    nca
    Participant

    No, that sounds pretty much the same as our program-

    1 soil science, 1 Plant Bio, chem, two ecology courses, geology, plant id, two site engineering “studios,” and 8 or so design studios among a few other core requirements.

    #175209

    I have a BLA from LSU and I think I heard somewhere that a BLA program is 5 years and BSLA I think is 4 years.

    #175208

    Clayton Munson
    Participant

    I have a BLA from UIUC. The department was in the College of Fine and Applied Arts, with Architecture, Music, and Dance. We were often forgotten. It was a 4 yr program in 2006 when I graduated but has since changed to a 5 yr program. I think a lot of it depends on where it is placed within the University organization and what types of classes are required.

    I’m sure the accreditation board has some sort of guideline that they follow.

    #175207

    Clayton Munson
    Participant

    Here is a Link for ASLA. http://www.asla.org/AccreditationLAAB.aspx#_LAAB_Documents you can dig through here and maybe find some answers. Looks like about half way down you will find this 2005 LAAB Accreditation Standards. Might have something in it.

    #175206

    nca
    Participant

    Untrue. Our BSLA program is 5 years.

    #175205

    nca
    Participant

    BSLA programs are in fact 5 years and studio focused. We also have a spearate program here for Landscape design, horticulure and contracting in the building adjacent to ours.

    #175204

    Will Richardson
    Participant

    I just found out that a BSLA is considered a “non-professional degree” and a BLA is considered a “professional degree”…

    #175203

    Adam Trujillo
    Participant

    I don’t think it really matters on a resume. I don’t think someone would rather hire someone with a BLA than a BSLA.

    #175202

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    It makes all the difference in the world when you go to take the licensing test in your state. If your degree is not accredited by LAAB, you do not qualify to sit for the exam after 3 years of practice or so. It will take you 10 years or so to become qualified. A BSLA is not accredited and is not a professional degree, whereas a BLA is accredited and therefore a professional degree. If you go for an MLA right after (and it is accredited). it won’t matter.

    Another difference, many times BSLA’s have different courses and options that do not necessarily mirror an structured accredited program.

    Just know that a BSLA is not the same as a BLA and it can very greatly affect your licensure candidacy, as well as job prospects (many firms will not hire a BSLA grad)

    #175201

    earthworker
    Participant

    To my knowledge the difference derives from what ‘College’ your University has classified Landscape Architecture under. I graduated BSLA from an Accredited program and am licensed. Originally, the program was accredited but not a B.S. It moved over to the College of Ag Science to receive an increased budget and greater access to computer labs. With it, came additional soils science and plant biology courses.

    Just because a program is a BLA or BSLA does not include or exclude it from Accreditation. Each program is judged individually by the Board. The board judges on curriculum, credit hours, faculty qualifications, longevity, enrollment, faculty petitions and technical writings and various other items.

    #175200

    Jim Del Carpio
    Participant

    Hello,

    From an employment perspective, I’ve seen in the past years, job postings from California had BSLA as a minimum requisite for employment as well as BLA. However, in my experience Design Firms are most interested in young candidates with BLA mostly, rarely BSLA, as a minimum requisite. Most common requisite is BLA minimum with 3-5 years of experience, or Master in L.A. with lesser experience.

    JD

    #175199

    Jason T. Radice
    Participant

    I am researching every LA program in the country, and almost all (thus far) are BLA’s that are accredited. I only found one BSLA that is listed as accredited. Perhaps LAAB makes it part of accreditation that the professional accredited degree is called BLA (like it is supposed to be) and MLA. It’s that way with architecture. Thanks for the correction.

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