feel like a typewritter salesman circa 1994?

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION feel like a typewritter salesman circa 1994?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #169906
    Hans C Stoll
    Participant

    Maybe its just Arizona, but trying to explain my industry at this time, to my friends in other industries….. I often say it feels like I am a typewritter salesman at the advent of the word-processor.

    #169926
    Keith Jankovsky
    Participant

    elaborate please.

    #169925
    nca
    Participant

    who’s got the word-processor?

    #169924
    Hans C Stoll
    Participant

    (elaboration: Trying to sell a service or product that few people feel they want or need at this time)

    Not sure who has the word-processor yet. Have one friend who is an RLA and has decided to chase Pharamcy as a career instead. Another RLA is becoming a teacher. Odd trend, ditching Landscape Architecture for something 100% un-related.

    #169923
    Frank Varro
    Participant

    It’s really more of a service few people KNOW they need. Most don’t know that a good landscape can (when the market starts to get back on its feet) increase your home value by, i seem to remember the number being in the neighborhood of, 5-15%. And that’s for private homes.

    The way i describe LA: In every city you have buildings, and everything else. Some one has to design EVERYTHING else- that’s my job. Whether its a road, a park, a plaza, or a yard, that’s what LAs do.

    #169922
    nca
    Participant

    To be honest I feel like your friends may have been in the wrong profession to begin with to go from LA to pharmacy..wow. I wonder what percentage of the current LA’s would make a switch like this? Could be good for those that stay.

    #169921
    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    LA to Pharm? My guess is they probably wanted to be within arms reach of ulcer and depression meds…

    #169920
    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    That is a pretty good generic summary of what we do.

    #169919
    Jon Quackenbush
    Participant

    On a side note, i just came into the possession of a 1920’s Underwood typewriter, it was in rough shape and i took it to a man in his mid eighties (perhaps one of the last people to know how one works) and he fixed it up like new. it sounds awesome and i think i may start to type my cover letters with it.

    #169918
    Bill Kisich
    Participant

    I think maybe what Hans is saying is, It’s really dead here in Phoenix, work wise.

    #169917
    nca
    Participant

    the pending statewide boycotts can’t help…there’s residential work here in Colorado, could be an indicator.

    #169916
    Hans C Stoll
    Participant

    Tempted….. Could I get a root-canal instead maybe?

    ­čÖé

    Hope all is well w/ you Russ.

    #169915
    Hans C Stoll
    Participant

    Yes. And less work = fewer actual positions, shrinking firms, fewer firms, shrinking salaries for those who have positions at a firm.

    What once felt like a valued and important occupation now feels like the “stepchild”. Trust me Architects and even Civil’s are feeling this too.

    Point specifically was that the title “Landscape Architect” in AZ at least is starting to feel like “typewriter repairman” in 1995 (when word-processors made typewriters a thing of the past).

    Trying to determine what the local or national CATALYST might be to turn this whole thing back onto the road and out of the ditch.

    The other thread (conversation about the state of our occupation) confirmed so much of what I have observed; That the carnage is deep and widespread and indiscriminate. Very good read (but very depressing conclusions).

    I tell myself and my friends that “this too shall pass”.

    BTW; Frank V. ‘s description of what we do is excellent. It conveys very simply and accurately the important service we provide.

    #169914
    Peter M. Boyle
    Participant

    Since I spent much of the past two years un- and under-employed, I can truly appreciate your dismal attitude, but you should only feel like a “typewriter salesman” if what you have to offer is outdated ideas and methods.

    Take it back even farther: picture yourself as a Macintosh computer salesman in 1984. ( talk about selling something that people feel they don’t want or need)

    #169913
    Steve_White
    Participant

    I didn’t read all the posts in this thread. But I think the topics pretty interesting and rather comical to think about.

    I have been out of work since august 09 so sometimes I am an out of work typewriter salesman. lol could it get any worse???

    But then i got to thinking. Its tough for LA’s who are down and out to think positively about our profession, on top of that we all know that LA work is important and we know why. its hard to explain hard to describe sometimes but it was put best in the post above.

    “we design everything else.”

    then i got thinking about your analogy to the typewriter. we are not the typewriter salesman. we are the paper sales man. Our products we support will change over time and we need to adapt with it. Paper is a resource that regardless of word processors will be needed for a wide variety of applications.

    As hard and not deserving as this profession can be, there is not much else i would want to spend my adult life doing.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Lost Password

Register