What To Call Yourself or I Like Poking Sleeping Bears with Sticks

Landscape Architecture for Landscape Architects Forums GENERAL DISCUSSION What To Call Yourself or I Like Poking Sleeping Bears with Sticks

Viewing 14 posts - 46 through 59 (of 59 total)
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  • #162652
    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    I am aware of that, but I think that the greater point that Melinda is making is that much of the work that is done by landscape contractors can impact these issues to some degree and that until any work crosses the threshold of needing a building permit in residential settings, there is no one monitoring potential impacts on health, safety, and welfare. I’d go further to say that the vast numbers of landscape contractors who service the residential market are unaware of many of these issues and are therefore oblivious to them.

    I know I was years ago as a young unschooled landscraper and I know that many people whom I worked for/with/over throughout the years were quite unaware.

    #162651
    Tin-Tin Azure
    Participant

    Sorry, I am British and currently living in China so not the easiest to keep up to date with ASLA. Is hard enough to keep update on the LI’s information whilst I am over here let alone other countries =[ . . i’ll try harder

    #162650
    Miles Barnard
    Participant

    Anybody want to talk about the effectiveness of the LARE and it’s content?  After I passed it I was determined to change it and make it more pertinent to what we actually do.  I failed on that endeavor ostly due to lack of effort, but I still think the thing sucks.

    #162649
    ALEX P
    Participant

    You can call yourself whatever you want… see custodial engineers or sandwich artists at Subway as case studies.  I consider myself a designer (not a garden or landscape designer).  We do everything from graphics to conceptual and abstract thinking.  Why worry about labels, its not middle school.  Just because you are not a “landscape architect” doesn’t mean you are not a landscape architect. I am not LEED certified but that does not mean i dont care about “sustainable” or “green” design.  I am never going to get licensed.  It just seems like a buzz kill.  Was Capability Brown licensed? … pry not.

    #162648
    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Perhaps you’re not giving your aunt nearly enough credit.

    #162647
    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Funny…I said the same thing about never getting my license, until opened my eyes and I saw the advantage of getting my license.

     

    I’m not a master brewer, but I still like to down a frosty one on a hot day. I love your logic Alex.  “I am not LEED certified but that does not mean i dont care about “sustainable” or “green” design”, that threw me off just like Jarrod’s “Johnny Fever” example. I caught myself reluctantly nodding in agreement and then saying, “Hey, wait a minute…”

    #162646
    ALEX P
    Participant

    gotta keep you on your toes Craig!  Why did you have to say wait a minute??? What’s wrong with the logic behind my statement.  In my experience (none) most of my class mates either got a secondary major/minor in environmental studies/science/LEED, yet i got a minor in design studies.  we all did LA, hence have the same general concerns and desires.  I just find art history more important than engulfing myself in native ecosystem of a spider, or turbidity of the colorado river.  I still care about ecosystems, but…  I dont want to be a “landscape architect”  I want to be a designer who went to school for landscape architecture.  in my humble opinion i think there needs to be more people like myself who know about LA, but dont practice it, thus can help de-mystify it for normal people like my mum, who still has no idea what LA even is/does.  That is what i meant by what i said.  Im glad you are licensed, but isn’t Martha Schwartz, not?  She is more of what i want to be. It just seems like we place so much precious energy in who gets to call what what, that it seems like we can forget about whats really important, for me thats design, for others its the turbidity of the colorado river. I have used my background education in landscape architecture to inform my Art, and conversations i can now have with anyone from a DNR person to an Artist, to a Museum Curator to an architect.  In all seriousness, what are the advantages to becoming licensed?  Why should I stop being a bachelor with LA and actually get married to it? 

    #162645
    Heather Smith
    Participant

    #162644
    Andrew Garulay, RLA
    Participant

    Is that a “Calibri” you are sporting there, officer?

    #162643
    ALEX P
    Participant

     

    Heather:  your font choices are appalling, but i guess if you refer to the original post about default fonts equating to default people i accepts your graphic decisions. I would expect nothing less from you.  Why does your police officer have a stutter? It must be the calibri taking control of him.  Also why is he wearing a baseball glove?  See, case in point, your bad font decisions made your graphics look even worse! 

    #162642
    ALEX P
    Participant

    yes!

    #162641
    Heather Smith
    Participant

    Way to zing me Alex. Unfortunately I can’t take credit for this…this cartoon is from http://www.marriedtothesea.com/…my fault for not citing.

    #162640
    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Becoming licensed provided me with more options. Some times firms specifically seek out RLAs as a feather in their cap on responding to RFPs and for breaks on their insurance. Also, I have the personal satisfaction of accomplishing my most important post graduation goal.

    #162639
    Ricky Peterika
    Participant

    Long thread, read about 50%.

     

    Before Licensure I referred to myself as:

    In casual conversation: “I work at a landscape architecture firm”

    On a resume: “Design Associate” or “LARE Candidate” (figuring in-field people would understand that) 

    When I was in (architecture) school: shirts were printed with “ARCHITECT” in bold across the front and I thought that was a little misleading; “I am in architecture school”; “I am an architecture student” 

     

    Admittedly, now it is easy, in any circumstance, without reserve, I can say: “I am a landscape architect”

     

    I wouldn’t discount the peace of mind that comes with passing a recognized threshold (but I am an idealist).

     

    I never like the word “intern” or “junior” but that is probably a personal preference. I read somewhere that not adopting LA until licensure could be motivation, which I agree with. Also, considering the work climate in Tampa right now, it doesn’t matter what you call yourself… it is still hard to find work.

Viewing 14 posts - 46 through 59 (of 59 total)
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