California Native Plants

  • I have been using more Baccharis pilularis ‘Pigeon Point’ up here in the East Bay of S.F. It seems to be an easy evergreen plant. So far, so good.

    Has anyone had any problems with it after it has established?

    Also what is your favorite Ceanothus and why?

  • Hi all.  I’m working on a planting plan for a steep slope in an area that has plenty of DG (East San Diego) and need to add a burgundy color to the palette.  All of the other plants are xeric.  I’m hoping to find something that someone doesn’t need to prune (due to the steepness) but that will add color even if it’s deciduous. I’m using Ma…[Read more]

  • Glenn, and all
    True that clients like to see green plants in the summer. Which is why some designers advocate a mix of native (80%) and non-native (20%) plants. The non-natives – which may require some summer water – stay green while the natives go summer brown.

  • Glenn Kranich posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 9 years ago

    Since many of our native plants go dormant in the summer as a survival technique to dry summers, I’m saying “advantageous for the summer-dry months” as it relates to the clients who prefer to see green plants and leaves still hanging onto their Buckeyes. Alternatively, Juncus, Western Sword Fern, and Iris, for instance, often receive summer water…[Read more]

  • Geoffrey Katz posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 9 years ago

    Glenn Do you really need to irrigate these plants that you mention in summer? They are native to N California, and so in a “natural” context do not get any summer water. Why would you need to irrigate them in a cultured situation?

  • Ashley- In urban settings, supplemental irrigation is advantageous for the summer-dry months. Specifically, I’ve used inline subsurface drip. Quality growing medium like compost is important too, along with mycorrhizal fungi applications to help plants thrive through root establishment. Some native plant material I have used are: Juncus…[Read more]

  • does anyone know how rain gardens thrive in the Bay Area? I am wondering because right now, its the rainy season, so everything is getting a lot of water – but when it is summer and dry, how do the plants in the rain garden get their water? What plants do you suggest putting in the rain garden?

  • Hello all
    For those of you in the San Fran Bay Area registration for the tour of East Bay native plant gardens just opened. Went last year, will go again this year. http://www.BringingBacktheNatives.net

  • Semiarundaria fastuosum is a good screen variety. Dense and upright.

  • Two years after clearing the invasives in my part of the creekbed in my backyard – you know, plants like Arundo and Tamarisk (how did that get there?) and Washingtonia palms (we all know how that got there) – the birds were kind enough to plant 3 Quercus agrifolia and a Toyon that is now about 12′ high. None of these are requiring additional water…[Read more]

  • Christmas berry!? They can make a landscape designer a hero!

  • I’m a residential Landscape Designer in San Diego’s East County. Has anyone mentioned Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano? They have a nice newsletter as well you can subscribe to.
    I like to incorporate garden-friendly california natives in my designs.

  • Jeremy Sison posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 10 years ago

    Here are some other resources. las pilitas nursery. 2 locations. North San Diego county (Escondido) & San Luis Obispo. http://www.laspilitas.com. website is deep with info. Another is “California Native Plants for the Garden” by Carol Bornstein, Bart O’brien & David Fross. Cachuma Press. David Fross was my Cal Natives Professor at Cal Poly, SLO. Lots of…[Read more]

  • Mark Simmons posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 10 years ago

    Agree with Ken and Blake. There’s also some nurseries that specialize in natives. Yerba Buena Nursery south of SF has a demonstration garden with labeled plants and the owners are VERY knowledgeable. Also, North Coast Nursery and Cal Flora in Sonoma County. Also, it’s good to be mindful of the fact that California has many totaly different native…[Read more]

  • Ken Smith posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 10 years ago

    Katrina, to clarify, UCBG and Tilden are in Berkeley and Merritt College is in Oakland.

  • Brock Axthelm posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 10 years ago

    The South Lake Tahoe and North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Gardens show a plethora of California Native plants used in the high Sierra. These gardens give great examples of California Native plants at diffrent stages of development.

  • Ken Smith posted an update in the group Group logo of California Native PlantsCalifornia Native Plants 10 years ago

    Agree with Blake — the Merritt program is great. I also volunteered at Tilden’s native nursery on Thursday mornings — propagating, etc. It was a great way to learn about natives. U.C. Botanical Garden and the Tilden Park (native) Botanical Garden are both stunning places to check out CA natives in a park setting.

  • you may also want to check out the horticulture program at Merritt College for i.d. classes. http://www.merrritt.edu

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