JIm Leggitt

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  • #162492

    JIm Leggitt
    Participant

    Great idea! I would love for you to get a set to me for testing on my Cintiq. I’d like to also learn how you went about producing the color set. Perhaps I can feature you and your process in an upcoming blog post. Interested? Jim Leggitt

    #163716

    JIm Leggitt
    Participant

    Good question Adele. Scan all originals “in color” at 300dpi. Do this with in progress drawings as well. I prefer Chartpak AD markers over all others because of the Xylene ink formula – it flows more evenly than the other alcohol based markers. As for markers smearing linework on prints, here is your answer:

    1. Stay away from coloring on prints from toner based (that’s the black power used for the print) printers such as xerox and laser printers. The powder that has been heat fused to create the lines will melt from the marker ink. 

    2. Use printers that have liquid inks – ink jet printers. I don’t have any issues using markers on prints made from those machines.

    If you have no choice but to use a toner based printer, skip coloring with markers and use colored pencils.

    #173349

    JIm Leggitt
    Participant

    Good point Melanie. I believe everyone should populate drawings with people and entoruage to help animate the image and give it much needed context and scale. I’ve been very aware of how SketchUp has helped visualists with easy placement of people into views, but also how trapped many have become with leaving the SU components untouched without any hand drawn modification. My book, Drawing Shortcuts Second Edition is being published by John Wiley & Sons in December 2009 and really dives into how we as designers can easily merge hand drawn techniques with computer generated views. My Simple Composite Method combines traditional hand drawing with digital imaging, which I call Tradigital Drawing. Merging paper and pixels. With quick and simple modifications, your people in drawings take on an authentic “one-of-a-kind” character and gets completely away from the rubber stamping effect. The goal of all visualization is to effectively communicate your idea with an image reflective of your drawing identity and thrills the viewer about your design concept.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)

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