Tosh K

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  • #151178
    Tosh K
    Participant

    What I’m seeing: Brexit has caused screeching halts across architecture firms in Britain, seems like we’re taking similar approaches in doing international business; firms are bracing to lose H1B workers, younger US workers seem to be asking for more and doing less to take advantage of that; funded work is continuing / unfunded or funding pending work is slowly being put on hold; clients with businesses friendly to the administration or continuing work, those not friendly are pulling funding out of construction; the hope of deregulation is making our low-end vendors and contractors optimistic they can make better profits on their work; states are going after de-licensure harder.

    I’m optimistic that they do push forward infrastructure funding, but it seems their proposing stripping the bills pushed forward by DeLauro et al for the last couple of decades of the areas that LAs work on in favor of engineering heavy projects.

    #151049
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’

    #151292
    Tosh K
    Participant

    I’d say take a look around and see if you can find the disk version of an older AutoCAD (even back to 2012) – while some things have remarkably improved in recent versions, the basic command set for putting a drawing set together hasn’t changed all that much in 10 yrs. 

    Once you get familiar with the software you could ask some more experienced person to help you understand how drawing sets are structured and try to replicate details and drawings from something like the Landscape Architecture Graphic Standard.

    For job searches: reach out to landscapers and nurseries too, some offer ‘design services’ which they farm out.  It may be commission based, but it can be a place to start.

    #151285
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Some of it is influenced by where the applicant is in their life.  In the big cities there is a lot to do (often for free): lectures, gallery openings, vendor parties, etc.  In NYC, it seems the younger folks all go out, and are less concerned with living in a smaller apt further out (you can still easily pay well under $1k/month in Manhattan for a room).  The range of firms (and jobs in related fields) is quite large and the ability to network with a diverse population is quite exciting for many.  In my experience the salaries, once a few years established are quite higher than rural areas (though dependent on firms, there are types of firms that could really only function in the cities with clients are there)

    #151290
    Tosh K
    Participant

    In small offices you’re forced into it; larger ones may send you through a program (PSMJ a consulting firm offered one).  Yes, engineering/architecture PMing is all the same – I’d say engineers tend to have a smoother process as they seem to train theirs (architects often just learn it on the job which leaves a lot of holes)

    #151318
    Tosh K
    Participant

    2nd Andrew’s recommendation – I learned AutoCAD on the job in a city engineering department.  Alternatively maybe with a contractor (shop drawings).

    #151345
    Tosh K
    Participant

    I chose my program based on: student work, where alumni worked after graduating, dedicated teaching faculty, the pedagogy of the school, and the studio culture when I visited, faculty recommendation (from the architecture faculty in college.

    It’s good to visit a few schools to begin to see how they differ: students and faculty personalities can create a different feel.  Looking at faculty research and student projects will also be a good indication of the type of topics covered in design studios.

    A good thing to know is the financial side of the program – scholarships/fellowships/incidental costs (travel studios/printing/etc can add up).

    #151419
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Are you looking for those graphic zoning books that were quite popular in the 90s and 00s down in FL? The kind produced for Celebration, Seaside, WaterColor, etc or parts of Charleston?  I know it’s been central to the push for NU developments but often has come under criticism for being a mechanism to enforce ‘taste police’ and a homogeneous appearance to a community (and can be used to influence flow of work from planning to architecture).

    The term comes from clothing pattern books – registering it is strange.

    They usually are graphic heavy to help lay people understand the zoning restrictions (building envelope, setbacks, fence heights, planting restrictions, building forms) and often include a style section going as far as paint/material/plant palettes.  They’re most often found in more ‘exclusive’ neighborhoods.

    #154099
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Turnaround in exam has partially to do with them analyzing the ‘tryout questions’ – the small body of volunteers available to write and review exam questions makes it difficult for rapid turnaround.  I’m assuming you’re heavily lobbying local veteran professionals to help chip in on the process.

    Exam study books are the books the writers of the questions are referencing (part of the question writing process is identifying where the information was found).  I found that the study materials from the 70s and 80s were far more comprehensive than the more recent literature (and I’ll say Landscape Architecture Graphic Standards is pretty comprehensive in its scope; I’d argue between that, Site Engineering for LAs and Chapters 9/10 of Heinze’s Construction Contracts you should be able to pass all 4 sections).

    Exam fees are comparable to architecture ($1470 + state authorization ~$150 for ARE, 1780 for LARE); again we suffer from smaller bulk discount.

    Most chapters of ASLA are busy with dealing with the state boards and state legislature (many of whom limit our practice or are trying to remove our license) – it’s how we ‘stick up’ for the profession: increase our ability to practice by adding ‘landscape architecture’ to the list of qualified professionals on legislation, limiting other under qualified groups from practicing landscape architecture (surveyors, interior designers, landscape designers), protecting liability in emergency response, etc.  Also, note that it is a volunteer organization and relies on participation by its members.

    #151410
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Some of Shlomo Aronson’s monographs include historical landscape references (Israel).

    #151458
    Tosh K
    Participant

    not around fire, but the recycled rubber surfaces are pretty nice – you can also use the gravel ones too (I would think the urethane binder is flammable thought)

    #151459
    Tosh K
    Participant

    stone dust and oyster shells?

    #151448
    Tosh K
    Participant

    work for places that will give you a good work/life balance – I know too many people that traveled for work or worked in foreign places only to find that they only worked.  As with all jobs, have a great presentation ready (portfolio, resume, enthusiasm), know the language of the business (if not the place), and have some type of network.  A lot of bigger firms have international offices where you might be able to transfer back.  For smaller firms, it may be harder for them to take on someone not familiar with the nature of the business environment (codes, laws, etc) and plant material.

    Alternatively you might look for work in a related line of work.

    #151453
    Tosh K
    Participant

    US, but engineering and history undergrad.  I find it helpful to have a different background.

    #151472
    Tosh K
    Participant

    Not sure what you’re looking for – it’s nearly impossible to do a universal assessment.  Even license exams aren’t that thorough.  You’d be asking to test: horticulture knowledge, grading, drainage, materials, detailing, specifications, software, office standards, writing, codes, erosion sediment control, design, drawing, modeling, etc, etc, etc.

    Best way most faculty keep track is by staying in touch with firms that hire their alumni – most faculty know which students are good in their eyes, asking seasoned professionals helps figure out what the alumni learned in school and what they’re missing.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 363 total)

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