Employer won’t give me permission to use any of the work I’ve done here

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Andrew Garulay, RLA 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #154222

    Cory Blaquiere
    Participant

    Haha, last I checked there was nothing in my contract about slavery 🙂

    In Canada, we have the BCSLA and the OALA (BC and Ontario, respectively). They only contain language regarding respecting the confidentiality of documents received from clients or employers. They do contain language stating that a member will always acknowledge work done by another member, though. I assume this works both ways, me giving credit to an employer and my employer giving credit to me.

    Thanks for the support. And yeah, I have to second “bad-mouthing”, that’s the quickest way to ruin an interview.

    #154221

    Barbara Brem
    Participant

    Just be very clear about your particular participation on each project. 

    That is, by stating both the entire scope of the project as well as your responsibilities, an interviewer can better understand your involvement on each project as well as your overall experience in different areas (design vs CD production vs CA vs client interaction, etc).  This should minimize misunderstandings with regard to your project involvement as well as leave no room for your current employer to claim that you were misleading by presenting an “entire” project as “yours” vs just the “small” part that you help on.

    #154220

    J. Robert Wainner
    Participant

    Well, I really believe it was those (13 yrs.) of experience that was the KEY.  But, as I mentioned before on this thread…..LA’s really need to be looking down the road.  I realize it’s more difficult today to do that than maybe in previous years.

    But really, once an LA reaches his/her early to mid-40’s…..keeping a job or getting a new one can be difficult.  You need to either OWN the firm or be a Principal OR Partner…an established member of that LA firm – where you feel your future is secure!

    I actually enjoyed going it alone.  I had 100% control over my designs, but, I really needed that “experience” OR I wouldn’t have been able to produce.  I had no other LA’s to review my designs.  I will say, it’s more difficult for a Freelance (one person LA firm) to get those larger design projects…..I was just fortunate to have had 13 yrs. of extensive experience designing upscale multi-family projects…so, I was able to get a lot of that type of work.  Normally, residential designs is what you’re going to be getting – for the most part….and maybe some light commercial and/or retail.  Marketing – having a great Website is critical….a website showing renderings, sketches, final drawings and of course photos of built work.

    Be aware of this….and I think this is pretty much true no matter what profession you’re in.  It will most likely take you at least (2) full years to get your OWN firm established…..to the point where you can earn a living from it.  No matter how much exp. you have, no matter how much start-up cash you have.  It took me almost (3) yrs. to get established on my own….and I had (13) yrs. of LA experience.

    I recommend ALL LA’s get as much experience as possible from entry level through the first 15+ years….with a WIDE variety of projects.  Prepare yourselves for your future.  Begin building a first class LA Portfolio from day one….you’ll need it later on.  Be thinking of your Future….don’t allow yourselves to get “surprised” at say age 40 to 50…..without an LA job.  Because, as I mentioned before, few LA firms hire LA’s over 45…..I think they prefer to bring younger LA’s up through the ranks…plus, LA firms are always going to be concerning about “salaries” & their overheads.

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