Planting plans

This topic contains 1 reply, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Dave McCorquodale 4 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #152532

    Ernst Glaeser
    Participant

    That’s why I had originally differentiated between Concept Plan (Rendering to sell your idea) and the Planting Plan who’s making the price. Our forefathers had that “Generation Look”. Unfortunately that got lost over the decades.

    #152531

    75% of mature size.

    #152530

    Ryland Fox
    Participant

    i second the 75% size rule as well.  seems to work well.

    #152529

    Craig Anthony
    Participant

    Nice Rule of Thumb.

    I guess the exception would be plants that grow really slow.

    #152528

    Walter Bone
    Participant

    You should always show at mature sizes and if needed, show pics of actual sizes at planting.  Contractors may want show installed sizes, that is ok, but to show the client the end result, always show mature sizes.  Throughout Asia, firms show smaller than mature sizes for no reason at all, it is very frustrating trying to teach and show younger staff (most without an LA background) how to properly present planting plans graphically.  It’s a work in progress.

    #152527

    I have used 75% actual size for 15 years. exception to this is when there is a specimen tree or when trying to show multiple sizes of the same plant

    #152526

    Ann English
    Participant

    I agree on the 75% size for trees; depending in growth rate, I show shrubs at 75% (slow) or 100%. I also make notes on plans to use (and a list of which and qty) annuals as “cover crops” for first three years to accommodate the installation size. When a bed will move from sun to shade and the ground layer perennials will eventually be shade, I show those with a Temp. Sun annual/short lived perennial option for the time period I estimate the shade plants would not survive.

    #152525

    Richard Freeland
    Participant

    Hi, Ann.

    I’ve kind of struggled with what to spec in an area that’ll eventually become shaded. So you spec temporary perennials for sun, to be replaced with shade tolerant perennials when the bed is shaded out? Do you specify a specific time period for replacement? And how do you show this on a plan? Does the client usually “get it” that that’s what needs to happen?

    Thanks for your advice!

    #152524

    Ernst Glaeser
    Participant

    Agree, made similar experience, not only in China but also in the MENA region.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)

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