Leslie B Wagle

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 211 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #3558272

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    OK, had time to look more carefully at this, never saw a program like it. The first 2 years were professional preparation, then one would enter a concentration, and at that point could chose LA/planning. So there is some mystery if the person only took the first 2 years but it isn’t my region so will presume there was a deficiency for licensing but maybe not for minor level practicing.

    #3558269

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Also the person isn’t licensed in the state, but claims to have been “practicing landscape architecture” for some years, and is listed on an internet business list that way. I am always torn by these discoveries, knowing how hard other people work to do it right. I guess it’s none of my business since the person has “happy customers” and it doesn’t directly affect me and was accidentally stumbled upon. What do other people think of the obligation here? Pass it along to the Board in the same state (one LA in the same city has a very similar firm name in fact) or assume they already know?

    #3558268

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Thanks. I still don’t see a single course in landscape design, and the person cites a “Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Environmental studies” from another country, so don’t think UVA was used for the planning part of its program.

    #3558238

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Sorry for garbled sentences in the middle there – time needed for edits not long enough LOL

    #3558237

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    The future is a natural concern for those at the gateway, in the middle, and even in Bob’s (and my) lane who won’t be directly affected but still care about the field.

    As far as encouraging or discouraging young people, maybe the issue is whether what we foresee it in terms of their chances of doing classic design work (perhaps with over-emphasis on that)? I’m reading from those in mid-career what sounds more like we all have to make our own ”niche,” and those niches may be out there but the safe place in an all-LA firm doing aesthetic spaces (I tend to agree with Bob) is going to be rarer than students may be prepared to encounter. Even in residential work, there is growing competition from people with a piece of software passing themselves off as designers and I think their ”renderings” are impressive to the lay person and they (clients) those graphics come from or go straight to design/build firms without anybody involved having full LA training. If LA’s are doing public / corporate / multifamily etc. work, that’s better for the field but I we need to be truthful that there is no ”protected space.” That doesn’t mean a vast percentage of grads have to find another field, but they will have to be creative and pretty close to relentless to create their own pathways. So it’s not for the faint. Applied imagination will be needed out in the world as well as in the studio. If they can’t find a path, then they will be ”surplus.”

    That’s not what people want to hear but I bet it’s going to be a rougher world in general. Still, in the new ranges of chanllenges, there should be some bright spots for the determined, maybe not easy to see but what I like is when people describe to the forum the steps and results of how they found their way.

    #3558134

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Wouldn’t it be a problem something like collaborations on google drive or dropbox? These can get messy though, lol but so can an individual left to oneself. I think the key is having a clear folder for each project, then subfolders (used with some discipline) holding background info (client notes, maps etc.), preliminary designs, design elaboration drawings, and final presentation graphics. Same for estimating, etc. And then letting each other know regularly when there are revisions and updates to be shared.

    #3558114

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I think back to the original issue, however you hand over the results, the process is basically to start from the FFLs, analyze where the places are around the perimeter or edges of natural areas that you have to match or want to save, then work on the most critical surfaces (pedestrian entries, approaches), next the the moderately critical (drives, parking which can warp lots of ways to inlets), then allow the most flexible areas to accomodate the others (lawns and ground cover areas, etc.) trying all along not to rely on expensive fixes like retaining walls. Depending on the project, you may even get to tweak the FFLs. Gradually by relating all the components to each other, it will come together. Even with a responsive software, that would be my guess about the guiding hand part of it, and it gets more intuitive with experience.

    #3558023

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Learn some desktop publishing (a few years ago it was QuarkXpress, now maybe InDesign) and you may be able to get on a late shift at a magazine or similar place. Other graphics possibilities may exist like website support on a freelance basis for small companies who don’t want to manage their own, and that can benefit you as a side skill to LA. It can help beef up your resume in applying for work or to support yourself. In the meantime, expand on such skills as 3D and rendering for the same reasons.

    #3557825

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Wow, I goofed up – I meant for this to go into the “internship” topic, if a moderator wants to move it….

    #3557818

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Here is something maybe a little to the side but I stumbled onto. These are suggested characteristics for architects to have and I think would be the same for LA’s, considering them both as designers in the environment. And besides being traits to look for being going into the field(s), they would apply to having what it takes to stay and grow in the field:

    10 Signs That You Should Become an Architect

    #3557786

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I haven’t had much to say on the where to locate yourself topic, because there are so many issues for each person/family but I guess my philosophy was shaped by already being married with a child when I graduated. When things were rough someone might ask why not move but then if you chose a ”region,” as we did and decided it would be our “roots,” why not hold out hope where you can search deeply (days before internet duly noted). Also we were burned a couple of times by bad bosses and outcomes, and we just couldn’t see blasting ourselves into the unknown to have that happen yet again (although a single person traveling light could do it).

    What I really notice looking back (maybe this should go into the first day of classes / life satisfaction topic)…is that I ended up with more of a patchwork than I expected. Some of all of these: working for self, small offices, large offices, government, design/build, and teaching. Yet all of them taught me things that I may not have appreciated at the time, but came in handy in hindsight. I’d advise people to keep enough information, drawings, and photos to be able to show for moving through your career. That is, for situations that involve being hired as a consultant as well as for a steady position. It has helped so much to hear of something I’d like to do, and be able to recall having actually worked on something like it, and dig it out of the stash…whether a PUD or a single entry sign. Managers and clients both are careful about who they put their trust into, and being able to show something actually performed (and preferably built) really can ease their minds.

    #3557772

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I was originally interested in private residential and small scale social spaces (urban mini parks etc.) but was open minded and just soaked in the education and hoped for the best. I assumed I would be in some medium sized office and eventually feel secure enough to work for myself (not necessarily build a multi-person business). As it turned out, I found myself in a city with enough work opportunities to get the time needed for the exam, but that weren’t challenging or financially steady enough to justify staying on once I had that license. So I struck out of my own earlier than ideal, then just made it work. Fortunately, some repeat clients helped steady it, but there were advantages in being self-directed while my son was growing up. I later got invited for 3 years into a major firm in a nearby city about the time my son was leaving for college anyway, but a recession ended that and I floundered for a couple of years getting some old business back again.

    The main semi-regret is that there was an opening in a city planning office, and I thought I was lucky to be hired. It was a commute and longer hours, which solved the immediate problem. Then in the course of working there, while I finally was able to get good benefits and save for retirement, the tasks of course were basically administrative and regulatory, not creative in the sense of classic LA. And it only took a couple of what I felt were bad “tweaks” made by management to turn me seriously unhappy. I did try for other positions but all were further away, had other negatives, etc. and I dreaded re-kindling what would have to be a new start from scratch 1-person business. The whole passage eventually lasted 15 years but I was “free” then to do anything I wanted.

    During that time, new tools such as Google Maps, dropbox, and just plain information searching had evolved and so I thought I would try virtual consulting. It’s been pretty rewarding but not a substitute for a full time job if you are still in the main career lane or have more family obligations (my son is grown and all I want is a part time life challenge). I think I am essentially trying to “compensate” for the planning time and just enjoying the chance to tackle real life if minor scale projects. So at both the start and end of my career, that aspect of self-direction, i.e. flexibility &/or lower pressure pacing has worked out well.

    #3557747

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    “going out there and finding a place to be productive regardless of what the sign says” is right on….except that convincing someone to let you participate depends on some kind of credentials. So, I think LA will need to have credibility with other professionals or whoever forms teams of people to work in those promising future areas. But the label will be hurt if what Bob says is true about LA’s becoming submerged in a mixed population of unreliable quality. People ultimately learn what they need to look for in skills and portfolios. An existing field really needs to be sure it has a “defining core” that is solid among most of its members.

    #3557742

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Note: 2006 to 2016 were the recession years. And if that is projected forward, it might yield Bob’s 2016-2026 numbers. Could such further sliding be warped by the grimmer past? (I’d be interested in how architects fared and are predicted to do along these same time frames).

    #3557741

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    It’s strange if true. I’m sort of finding (nothing scientific) that more people seem to know what we are and can do. But I agree I don’t think all that many positions are available in large swaths of the country, and invisibility will whittle away at the numbers over time as fewer young people get inspired to enter the field. I wonder if the Joseph’s reduction can be explained by people leaving? Or are they doing related but differently-labeled work which is hard to detect in gathering statistics? Andrew in another topic has mentioned other “gray” areas where we end up. That would also affect Bob’s numbers on job openings if some aren’t counted.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 211 total)

Lost Password

Register