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Britain’s Got Talent: 10 Awesome Projects From the UK

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We take a look at 10 projects that are excellent examples of landscape architecture in Britain.  All of us know how important is to have interesting references to other projects as a learning resource and for inspiration. Today, we are happy to offer you a collection of great designs from one of the historically more passionate communities on landscaping – Great Britain. We recommend that you keep up with what is happening on these islands: There are plenty of projects worth knowing for their sustainable values, innovation, creativity, and even sense of humor.

1. Longleat Hedge Maze, Wiltshire (England), by Greg Bright (1975)

An interesting and creative play space, this garden challenges visitors to have fun in a simple but effective way. The classical maze of yew trees has been enhanced with bridges and an observation tower within its 13/4 miles of paths. Many people have walked through, finding different fortunes along the way. Would you dare to try one of the world’s longest mazes?

"Longleat Maze" by Jon Candy at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

“Longleat Maze” by Jon Candy at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

2. Solar Lily on the River Clyde, Glasgow (Scotland), by ZM Architecture (2008)

In this project, solar panels have landed in the water to provide clean energy and be integrated into the urban waterfront. The lilies have motors that cause them to move and turn according to solar radiation. This idea has caught the attention of municipal agencies in different countries where the lilies could float as well.

"Solar Lily " by 7_70 at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

“Solar Lily 2.0 ” by 7_70 at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

3. The Hobbit House in the Hill, Wales, by Simon Dale

Going beyond its undeniable inspiration, the Hobbit House in the Hill is remarkable because it adds a strategy to that singular appearance. This is a sustainable building that uses organic shapes and natural materials to make it look like a landform. And it is still a low-cost project — £3,000 — with a simplified construction system based on sensible ideas. Are Hobbit houses the future solution for small-scale sites?

WATCH: Green future is possible! The eco house of Simon Dale WWW.GOODNEWS.WS

4. The Enchanted Forest Lighting Event at Faskally Wood, Pitlochry (Scotland), by Flux

Faskally Wood is an extensive forest in which a very special night show occurs each autumn. An awarded festival of lighting and sound takes the environment itself as an enchanted scenario, inviting visitors to be surprised. The lighting installation turns the trees and the water feature into bright colors, creating different sensations along the walk. Popular tales seems to come alive in this magical event.

Courtesy of The Enchanted Forest Community Trust Author: Graham Smith

Courtesy of The Enchanted Forest Community Trust. Author: Graham Smith

Courtesy of The Enchanted Forest Community Trust Author: Julie Broadfoot

Courtesy of The Enchanted Forest Community Trust. Author: Julie Broadfoot

5. Old Market Square, Nottingham (England), by Gustafson Porter (2007)

This great design by Gustafson Porter won a competition to redevelop the most ancient medieval square in the United Kingdom — and the second largest in size. Rethinking the original topography to provide a composition of water terraces and accessible surface for pedestrians was a key strategy. At the same time, the designers reinforced the diagonal connections, balancing the powerful presence of the City Council building. The project provides both contemporary style and excellent integration in its context.

WATCH: Old Market Square – Nottingham

"Water Fountain in Market Square" by Shelley Rodrigo at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

“Water Fountain in Market Square” by Shelley Rodrigo at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

6. Roof Gardens at Crossrail Place in Canary Wharf, London (England), by Foster + Partners and Gillespies (2015)

"Looking east through the garden above Crossrail's Canary Wharf railway station." by Matt Buck at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

“Looking east through the garden above Crossrail’s Canary Wharf railway station.” by Matt Buck at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

London showcases the new green gem of its spectacular roof revolution: this public garden at the top of a rail station. There are more than 300 meters of tropical landscape to enjoy, whatever the weather, as it has been partially covered by an innovative transparent structure. In 2018, the garden will become a meaningful welcome gate between the city’s east and west sides.

7. Lost Gardens of Heligan, Cornwall (England)

These impressive gardens had been neglected for more than 70 years until they were discovered bit by bit in the 1990s as real “secret gardens”. Now, they are the largest restoration work in Europe, with subtropical jungle and Victorian gardens, among others. But many people identify the place thanks to surprising sculptures created by Susan and Pete Hill. Landscaping enthusiasts, here are more than 200 acres of mysterious gardens to explore and get lost in.

"SLEEPING GODDESS AT THE LOST GARDENS OF HELIGAN." by Loco Steve at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

“SLEEPING GODDESS AT THE LOST GARDENS OF HELIGAN.” by Loco Steve at Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

8. King’s Cross Pond Club, London (England), by Ooze Architects/Marjetica Potrc/BIOTOP (2015)

Its creators consider this sinuous pool a multidimensional project because it is a land artwork, a leisure urban piece, and an innovative installation. King’s Cross Pond is the first public pool in the United Kingdom to be maintained without chemicals, due to a design that takes into account the ability of wetlands and submerged plants to clean the water. The system keeps the 40-meter-long pool safe for swimming.

WATCH: King’s Cross Pond Club: Eva Pfannes and Sylvain Hartenberg discuss the project

9. The Gardens of Cosmic Speculation, Dumfries (Scotland), by Charles Jencks (1989)

It is difficult to overlook these unconventional Scottish gardens. Their 30-acre surface seems to question reality and rules with its sequence of curved landforms, challenging sculptures, bridges, and ingenious water features, all involved in a huge game of optical illusion. Charles Jencks always provides very personal perspectives on any landscape, creating abstract gardens that have their roots in mathematics and cosmology.

WATCH: حديقة التكهنات الكونية في أسكتلندا The Garden of Cosmic Speculation – Charles Jencks

10. The Eden Project, Cornwall (England), by Nicholas Grimshaw (2001)

The landscape of Cornwall is home to an impressive botanical garden formed by two indoor and one more outdoor environments. Each set of geodesic domes reproduces inside the Mediterranean Biome (the world’s largest in its class) and the Tropical Biome respectively, while you can find global temperate regions in the Outdoor Biome. The project has clear educational objectives as well as sustainability and conservation of vegetal species purposes.

 The iconic bio-domes of the Eden Project, Cornwall, England. Photo credit: originally posted to Flickr as The Biomes. Author - Jon. Licensed under CC-SA 2.0. Image source

The iconic bio-domes of the Eden Project, Cornwall, England. Photo credit: originally posted to Flickr as The Biomes. Author – Jon. Licensed under CC-SA 2.0. Image source

After exploring these refreshing ideas through a short immersion in the British scenery, let’s continue feeding our curiosity and celebrate the world’s landscape architecture. Recommended Reading:

Article by Elisa García Nieto Return to Homepage

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