Jennifer de Graaf

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  • #161655

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    you could post the job on asla.org joblink

    #162417

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    Another font generating website (I have not tried it) for about $10.:

    http://www.writing-fonts.com/fontapi/

     

    #162399

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    since you have been writing for three years, it might be time to take some of the older stuff and see if it needs updating and re-doing.  I usually think up new things to write about on garden tours and walks around the neighborhood, I write them down and keep a list of issues that delight / bother me.  There’s usually something in there I can use if I feel the need for a new topic.  I’ll also write about experiences with nurseries or contractors (leaving names out if it is negative).  For example, I recently had a great experience at a mail order nursery’s open house.  I hope this helps!

    http://degraafassoc.wordpress.com/

     

    p.s. if you haven’t read the Studio G blog, you MUST!  (listed under the first person who responded, Rochelle Greayer)

     

    #165354

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I see that your Issuu portfolio is 31 pages long.  Out of curiosity, have you noticed how far do most viewers look?

    #162451

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    So many good points have been made so far, I have only a little to add:

     

    When I lived in Texas, I was very involved in my state and local chapters, and I had a great time.  Since moving to California, I have not found the same opportunities I enjoyed in Texas, but I was not looking for them, either.  I let my ASLA national membership lapse and did not miss it one bit.  I felt that the only benefit I enjoyed was the magazine, but that’s not enough to justify a $400. membership fee.

     

    In the last few years, the economy and technology have combined to make me a more network-y person.  Because of BOTH of these things, I plan to attend the ASLA conference for the first time in several years this October.

     

    The point?  With my non-member attendance fee for the conference, I will be forced into being a member once again.  I will be sent the magazine, and I have no option to attend the conference and skip these add-ons.  I have to wonder how many of those “strong membership numbers” are from people who will attend the conference because they feel the need to network, maybe visit the marketplace, and attend the Job Link booth…but who would opt-out of the “perks” if they had the chance.  I know I would.

    #162482

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    Chris –

     

    I looked both of them up on Joblink.  To me, an internship is a low-paying or unpaid temporary position with the express purpose of helping entry level people gain some experience (and contacts, mentorship, and a letter of recommendation). 

    The MA one requires 4-6 years experience with confidence and the ability to get right to work, appears not to offer compensation, and promises nothing except the possibility that there might be work in the fall.

     

    The NY posting requires either a degree in landscape architecture or a LICENSE!  At least they mention some kind of compensation.  They need to decide what they’re looking for, because only one of those qualifications sounds like an internship candidate to me. 

     

    These ads do a disservice to our profession.  Joblink is public and anyone can look at these and make a judgement about the integrity of the field.  If I were still a student and saw these, I would find it very disappointing.  Forget that, I DO find it disappointing!

     

    My feeling is that many firms are too nervous to hire someone permanent and those above are mis-using the word intern.  They should be using words like “temporary” and “entry level”, then not asking for licensed and experienced professionals to work for too little or for free.

     

    I have had two experiences recently that I think are relevant, see below….but neither of these prospective employers mis-represented the work to me, both were perfectly clear.  I do think that they illustrate how things are changing:

     

    I had an interview with one company that asked me to work a couple of days as a “try-out”, something they were doing to make sure that candidates would be a good fit.  I agreed and got paid a small hourly rate for three days (I figure what could three days at low pay hurt?).  They continued to interview other people while I was there, and I was not the only temporary person working.  When they asked me to continue working beyond those three days, I insisted on my consulting rate (twice what they paid the first 3 days) and they agreed.  I worked full-time for a few weeks and pulled a project up to meet a deadline that otherwise would not have been met. They have since run out of extra work and filling the opening is “on hold”.

     

    The second experience was another local firm that also had a looming deadline and was under-staffed.  I was able to step-in, get the project to their deadline and they paid my consulting rate for the whole time.  They will be hiring again someday, but now that this deadline has been met, the crisis is over and I am not needed. 

     

    If either company needs more help sometime, maybe they’ll call me, and maybe not….  BUT, I would recommend that anyone faced with advertisements like these challenge those who posted them and insist on being paid a reasonable rate for the experience that you bring to the table.

    #162695

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    First, you are a designer, but I don’t see any images on your resume – so I assume that they don’t get to see any samples of work until/unless they call for an interview?  Back in the day, resumes were just type, but I think those days are over (in my humble opinion).

     

    Second, please see this recent thread and this website (written for California, but I think it is pretty on-target) about titles for licensed vs unlicensed people.  

     

    good luck in your job hunt!

     

     

    #172864

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I am sorry, I only just (yes, 18 months later) saw this question.  Yes, those were the 1/3 cuts I mentioned.  How did you end up designing your portfolio?  I’d love to learn what you ended up doing!

    #170582

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    Susan – I notice that this posting is from a year ago – what did you do?  Did you find a satisfactory solution??  I have a collection of minisets (11×17 or 18×24) from past projects that I sometimes take to interviews (or second interviews) to show how I have organized a complete set of CD’s.  They’re precious, because some are my only copy, but they have been very helpful on occasion.

    #163239

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I am sorry nobody replied to you yet – I would encourage you to read the threads and keep your eyes on the Land8 blog.  We will be posting on the subject in the coming weeks/months.

    #173567

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I got mine at Flax Art in San Francisco.  I don’t know how their prices compare, but it is worth giving them a call and asking if you know what product you want.  They have a mail order catalog and would probably be willing to ship.

    #162874

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I don’t think that is true.  I’ve been asked to stamp drawings, and have seen my employers do the same.

    #163941

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I have taken the course, I did so when I was an undergrad and felt that it was WELL WORTH IT.  If you truly can’t afford it, at least buy the book and take whatever you can when the money is there.

    #165344

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    I try to make a “leave-behind” of some sort to remind interviewers which applicant I was, but I never EVER leave my good hard copy behind.  What if there’s a coffee spill?  or they lose it, or ??? Besides, by taking it with you, you can go to another interview and you never have to go back after not getting the job….

     

    Jen

    #165265

    Jennifer de Graaf
    Participant

    Having read most of what people are saying in this thread, my gut feeling is that you should start looking for a new job and only when you have one you want to take, “vote with your feet” and leave.   IF for some reason you want to stay there, use the new job offer as leverage in your current job to negotiate going back to regular salary or getting bonus, whatever.  Although I am not sure why you’d stay given what I’ve read here.

     

    Morale is an important part of working.  I have had some lousy experiences, and some great ones – it isn’t worth the stress to stay where you don’t want to be.

     

    Insert plug for: Employment Storytelling group

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