Leslie B Wagle

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  • #151153

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Andrew Garulay, RLA had the best answer to the current baffled interpretations of Trump voting earlier in the topic  Yes – I could change my mind – but I think things are actually more business as usual than the press wants them to be. There’s nothing they or invested out of power drama-inducing figures would love more than a “bad guy” and “virtuous massive uprising” myth to keep an uproar going, healthy for the country or not.

    Separate thought: Powerful men are rarely, well actually never in my memory, people I would want my kid to really imitate. But there are different magnifying glasses and all have astigmatisms based on underlying political leanings. I’m not sure I think either of the fear depictions are inaccurate so much as reshaped according to point of view. Conservatives truly think they are accepting of people from elsewhere, but  they hold the country as a coherency concept that is counterpoint to any foreign individual’s personal difficulties, and they don’t think it is obligated to fill non-citizens needs at all times, in any numbers, from anywhere.  They want to be sure newcomers can contribute to it with out costing it dearly for several generations, or exposing (all descriptions of) its current members to undue risk. Sorry, guess I’m wasting everybody’s spare brain cells in this one and need to get to work on my still turbulent LA reflections.

     

     

    #151156

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Craig, I find the rescue question a profound one I might want to answer you privately. Just a quick thought on the effectiveness of both rallies and protests, which I think are fundamentally the same. They pump up the already-converted; but outsiders find them both alienating and tiresome. Unlike a sporting event with unknown outcome, who if not a stalwart believer would sit through a political thing full length, even the big party conventions? Media knows better than try that, so all we get are highlight bits. I kind of doubt most of us are among the hardy few that have spent time at either one 🙂

     

    #151161

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant
    #151163

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant
    #151071

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Elderberry is big shrub with compound leaf….& big flat white flower clusters and later small purple berries. Main characteristic we learned from husband buying some (to hopefully make wine) is you can’t count on it to grow in a particular spot unless it just wants to, Found mostly in the wild along stream banks.

    #151073

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I thought of Photinia too. Pretty common in N.C. but you’d have to look for bronzy new growth for an additional clue.

    #151186

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    By the time I answered I didn’t notice the reference close to the top and thought you were just referring to Bob’s overall position(s). We may have a Muslim president some day, and it’s fine with me as that alone doesn’t present a problem. I was reading just today about the uncertainty whether people who had served as our scouts, advisors, translators, etc. in Iraq and other places will still be allowed to come in from the Middle East…and hope P. Trump will sure they get processed through and not left stranded.

    #151195

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Yeah I gave myself a few hours to think about what to say. Why doesn’t it seem obvious that calling other people “troll” or “hate filled” just might get a little bit in the way of an “honest, intelligent conversation”? That may drive them into silence but hardly convinces them. And the most visceral hate I’ve seen since the election has not flowed from, but has been pointed TOWARDS the center / center right. More than anything, this is a divide over the (perceived & desired) role, scope, cost, effectiveness etc. of government itself. We can’t afford for either side to wrap itself in an almost cultic exaggerated assumption of its own pure and unshared virtue. (Sorry for contributing to digression from L.A. issues.)

    #151247

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I think there is some disconnect between mental images of what people are discussing…John is thinking about “quick hand sketches” and not laborious hand renderings…and others have in mind efficient use of software vs. magazine level digital renderings like some of the webinar gurus produce. Either can be idea-capture efficient, and both can be worth a high labor investment on occasion, but the thing is to know what to apply and when. (Early stage work often isn’t exposed outside of the project team). I’ve seen some great demos of blended techniques, and all techniques become more comfortable & practical with frequent use. 

    #151205

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    The weak link is that part about people churning their earnings back into the community…. a dynamic dependent on having a foundation of adequate JOBS; yet nobody seemed to be nearly as concerned about how to grow that very essential condition alongside the big housing plan. And once people couldn’t support their payments…the tremors from millions of personal tragedies added up to a tsunami sized crisis for the whole economy. We were living on vapors while our foundation crumbled, in other words.

    #151210

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    I think it wasn’t free market ideals alone as much as a blend with a social engineering agenda (let’s get everybody into a home whether traditionally qualified or not) that the market responded to, then followed up with some pretty creative ways of passing on the inevitable risk. Mortgage backers would have been far more careful lending if they weren’t prodded into the everybody-in-a-house craziness but then regulators looked the other way at the bundling of strange packages that got passed on to “investors.”

    I am retelling this from the insights of someone behind the scenes in banking who passed it on. Bush actually warned that the system was in big trouble that had been accumulating (and I wasn’t a Bush fan). In fact, it was Congress that flatly rejected his call for years to reform the mess. His repeated attempts for more supervision were thwarted by the legislative maneuvering of those who emphatically denied there were problems. At any rate, the government as well as banks were up to their eyeballs in it, and it’s ludicrous to see any side or party try to ride around now like a knight on a white horse. Kinda like how the A.C.A. appealed to insurance companies and they are now bailing out as we begin to see the inevitable results of attempting to ignore the logical operation of insurance rates….that is, the avoidance by young people who are resisting their assigned role to pay what they don’t need (yet) themselves, in order to fund older sicker people who can’t cover what they didn’t prepare for. People don’t like to save for the future, wait for their goodies, or accept basic consequences ….who could imagine that?

    A little p.s. Could maybe all the reckless building era be partly a way to “keep a lot of people busy” as the least vulnerable part of the economy to foreign competition that we were letting into everything like textiles, steel etc.? Think about it…surveyors, lawyers, designers, contractors, tradesmen, land sales people, all the distributors or carpets and wallpaper and lighting and appliances (even if products were imported), the ladies who “show” houses…the decorators, magazine photographers, landscapers…

    #151324

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    This is just study material I stumbled into, that may help with the CSE:
    http://www.cselandscapearchitect.com/2012/12/23/12-days-of-quizzes-day-6-native-plants-and-planting-design-quiz/

    #151259

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Congrats on hanging in there and getting revival at 66. My ’74 trauma was move to take a great job that lasted 3 months before layoff, followed by patched together work enough to sit for and pass exam in ’77, then loner business with its ups and downs until offered another “great” job in ’87 that gave me 3 years instead of 3 months before layoff again. The resulting ’90-’92 experience was like yours, slow but reviving work, and when I responded to the planning ‘opportunity’ I had to break off the local contacts (no side work allowed). Then retiring 15 years later, I found I just couldn’t mount that effort again in one lifetime….So from 2008 forward, have kind of re-invented myself in pro bono work (advising with or without illustration of concepts) for non-profits mixed with the other passion (music). Now at 70 I’m still finding that blend has enough challenge. Our next thread should be how do we really know when to rest? I’m thinking some of us can just never cease to lend a hand or thought to the fullest of our ability, since it was never based on pure logic, but a degree of passion all along.

    #151270

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Robert: I played piano all my life (with a nice big lapse in the middle) took it up again during the planning years, and got into the second field (really multimedia vs. performance) approaching retirement. That gave my seniorhood another outlet to mix with wisps of design work, which I highly recommend for those further down the road than Jonathan. And other people may find something that wouldn’t have to prompt another round of training…I just found an on-line program and took it slow. Another retired LA I know is becoming a fine painter.

    #151271

    Leslie B Wagle
    Participant

    Jonathan, I sense your frustration but in response to the “Neither of those designers ever dealt with the great recession in the most fragile period of their careers (aka the beginning),” there is a lot more to tell but I spared the readers.

    Two recessions hit me (and HARD), one being exactly right after I graduated in ’74, another severe one in ’90-’92. (Deletion of tales of woe here). It is because of them and wondering if I ever really recovered that I do truly sympathize. I looked back to the icons of earlier history and thought THEY had it easier. Then in the building boom you refer to I was tucked away in a planning department doing some pretty awful stuff (mixed in with a bit of satisfaction). Nearing retirement it seemed the best place to stay. But yes this last recession has been horribly protracted.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 195 total)

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