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Top 10 Landscape Architecture Projects 2015

Landscape Architecture 2015

Article by Erin Tharp We searched the world for our “Top 10 Landscape Architecture Projects 2015”. This past year has been marked by some extremely innovative and forward thinking projects in landscape architecture. When selecting the top ten for 2015 we looked for projects that were not only sustainable but also projects that gave something back to the communities where they were built and are being used and loved by the people. All of the projects were completed in some form during the past year.

Landscape Architecture 2015

Where did this project feature in our top 10? Riverside Lünen. Photo credit: Claudia Dreyße, Dortmund

Landscape Architecture Projects of 2015

10. Crescent Park – New Orleans, LA by Hargreaves Associates, completed July 2015

Due to regulations and ownership, the city of New Orleans found itself with a 1.4-mile long piece of riverfront land and nothing to do with it. Hargreaves led the design team that included executive architect Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, and architects David Adjaye Associates and Michael Maltzan Architecture, to transform 20 acres of former port lands into a connective riverfront. The new park focuses on pedestrian connections between Bywater and Marginy neighborhoods with the Mississippi River, and helps to bring French Quarter tourists into the Crescent City. Website: www.hargreaves.com WATCH: Crescent Park

9. Mariahilfer Strasse – Vienna, Austria by Bureau B+B, completed 2015

As the longest stretch of shared space in Europe, the Mariahilfer Strasse redesign includes 1.6 kilometers and stretches from the Westbanhof to the Museum Quarter in a bustling section of downtown Vienna. Designers closed off sections to vehicles to make the space more pedestrian friendly and divided the site into three zones.

Mariahilfer Strasse

Mariahilfer Strasse. Photo credit: Ricky Rijkenberg

The central zone is known as the heartbeat of the site with lots of activities while the neighboring zones on each end serve as quieter spaces with more dense shopping shared with housing institutes and private use spaces. Sleek, modular site furnishings line the space to provide shoppers with places to stop and relax and take in the surrounding scenery.
Mariahilfer Strasse

Mariahilfer Strasse. Photo credit: Ricky Rijkenberg

Website: www.bplusb.nl

8. Riverside Lünen – Lünen, Germany by WBP Landschaftsarchitekten, completed February 2015

Due to a five-meter height difference between the park and the river designers were met with quite a challenge when asked to create a usable park along the Lippe River.

Riverside Lünen.

Riverside Lünen. Photo credit: Claudia Dreyße, Dortmund

They solved the problem by creating a path and stair system that doubles as a small amphitheater for outdoor events. By doing this they were able to leave the existing landscape alone so visitors can enjoy the natural beauty of the space while bringing the river to the center of the design. Once again, minimal intervention proves to be the best solution here. Read all about Riverside Lünen.
Riverside Lünen

Riverside Lünen

Website: www.wbp-landschaftsarchitekten.de

7. The Goods Line – Sydney, Australia by ASPECT, completed 2015

This unique elevated park was initiated by the NSW Government and delivered by the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority. What used to be an unused rail corridor running from Railroad Square to Darling Harbour is now a bustling park in the heart of one of Sydney’s most densely populated areas. “ “Once a conduit for trade, the former rail line is reinterpreted to carry the precious cargo of a thriving neighborhood – culture, creativity and community,” according to the parks website.

The Goods Line

The Goods Line. Photo credit: Florian Groehn

Website: www.aspect.net.au

6. Aalborg Waterfront II – Aalborg, Denmark by CF Møller, completed 2015

Based on the principles from the first stage of the project, the promenade once again becomes the unifying element. Designers also drew inspiration from the way the dunes meet the flat foreshore. At center stage is a coherent town plinth, with a raised base meant to unify the area’s distinctive freestanding buildings.

Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

It is meant to provide flood protection but also doubles as steps for sitting. Materials are raw and simple and the site includes a series of spacious plazas that are home to dense groves of trees.
Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

Aalborg Waterfront phase II. Photo credit: Joergen True

Website: www.cfmoller.com

5. Dong Da Lakescape – Qui Nhon, Vietnam, by MIA Design Studio, completed August 2015

Just a decade ago, this land was used by fisherman to store their boats during storms, which led to the development of temporary slums nearby. The overall environment, especially the lake due to the direct inflow of sewage, was degrading rapidly and the people of Qui Nhon knew they had to repair the damage. The first step was to install a new sewer system and then work on repairing the land. Designers extended the edge of the land out into the lake to create a buffer zone and included pedestrian friendly site furnishings that attract locals and tourists alike to the new natural setting. See Previous Versions of Top 10 Landscape Architecture Projects of the Year:

  • Top 10 Landscape Architecture Projects of 2014
  • Top 10 Landscape Architecture Projects of 2013
Image courtesy of : MIA Design Studio

Dong Da Lakescape. Image courtesy of MIA Design Studio

Dong Da Lakescape. Image courtesy of : MIA Design Studio

Dong Da Lakescape. Image courtesy of MIA Design Studio

Website: www.miadesignstudio.com

4. Barangaroo Headland Park – Sydney, Australia by PWP Landscape Architecture, completed March 2015

This is a park meant to unite cultural references and natural processes. This historic headland on an abandoned dock in Sydney Harbor had been forgotten for too long. Now, the “Club Cape” is made new again by the incorporation of an underground cultural center, public garage, a shoreline walk with pedestrian and bicycle paths separated by a sandstone wall that flows the 1836 shore edge. Designers included native plantings and a replicated bush landscape. Website: www.pwpla.com WATCH: Barangaroo Headland Park animation

3. Soil and Water – King’s Cross, London by Ooze Architects and Slovenian artist Marjetica Potrč, completed 2015

Sometimes it’s more about the intent of the project than the look of it. This installation’s intent is why it made the list. The installation is meant to make us think about the relationship between nature and the changing urban environment, designers claim that while buildings are viewed as permanent, the undeveloped spaces around them are in constant flux. So, what is it? It’s a natural bathing pond where visitors are invited to jump on in, and it’s right in the middle of the King’s Cross development site.

Soil and Water - King’s Cross, London by Ooze Architects. Photo credit:  John Sturrock

Soil and Water – King’s Cross, London by Ooze Architects. Photo credit: John Sturrock

Website: www.ooze.eu.com

2. Quzhou Luming Park – Quzhou, Zhejiang by Turenscape, completed July 2015

Designers used three design concepts to put together this 31.3-hectares park. Minimal intervention, productive urban farming landscape and water resilience are the driving forces behind this ecological space that is bringing in droves of visitors every day.

Quzhou Luming Park. Photos courtesy of Turenscape

Quzhou Luming Park. Photos courtesy of Turenscape.

Depending on the time of year people are greeted by a sea of sunflowers or canola, both of which are shocking to see in such a huge mass planting. Designers also included an environmental interpretation system as a way to introduce visitors to the natural and cultural history of the area. Read all about Quzhou Luming Park.
Quzhou Luming Park

Quzhou Luming Park. Photos courtesy of Turenscape

Website: www.turenscape.com

1. Navy Yard Central Green – Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, PA, USA. by James Corner Field Operations, Summer 2015 (June)

Towards the end of June, the Navy Yard in Philadelphia unveiled its sixth park addition to its expanding office campus. James Corner Field Operations has debuted a strong addition to Philly’s expanding simple but effective public spaces.

Philadelphia Navy Yards – Central Green

Philadelphia Navy Yards – Central Green. Credit: © Halkin Mason Photography

The 1200-acre Navy Yard is a dynamic urban development promoting business growth and smart energy innovation. The vision for the campus is concerned with creating environmentally friendly workplaces, industrial development, public spaces, residential development, and remarkable architecture.
Philadelphia Navy Yards – Central Green

Philadelphia Navy Yards – Central Green. Credit: © Halkin Mason Photography

Website: www.fieldoperations.net – This past year has definitely been filled with some interesting projects and this list in no way comes close to including all that could have been mentioned, but they are the best of the best from the best. They represent a level of standard and care that all designers should strive for when faced with a new challenge and should serve as inspiration for years to come. What do you think of this year’s list? Let us know in the comments below! Go to comments Recommended Reading:

Article by Erin Tharp Return to Homepage

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